Brain Myths – Crossword Puzzles Keep Alzheimer’s Away

It is well known that Crossword puzzles are supposed to keep Alzheimer away but this is in fact a myth.

Many people/scientists believe that keeping the brain active with things such as cross word puzzles and cards can prevent Alzheimer. In 1986 studies began on the brain to test the muscles in the brain. over 700 nuns donated their brains for scientific studies, Nuns were used because they all had similar lifestyles ( diet, Income, housing ). They were divided into groups, those who were better at languages and math and the nuns who were not as good. The people who were better at language and math were less likely to get Alzheimer’s.

Scientists say after the tests that people who keep their minds active and educated have less protein that forms beta amyloid plaques, which create diseases.

Problems with this myth?

Because many people think this is not in fact a brain myth cross word companies make a lot of money because more and more people from different age ranges buy crossword puzzles in fear of getting Alzheimer.

Overall Crossword puzzles do not prevent Alzheimer at all and keeping your brain active does not help.

Sources:

ALZinfo. “How Crossword Puzzles May Keep Alzheimer’s Away.” How Crossword Puzzles May Keep Alzheimer’s Away. Fisher Center For Alzheimer, n.d. Web. 9 May 2015.

Clark, Brendon B. “A Puzzle… Will Crosswords and Sudoku Prevent Alzheimer’s?” Bite Sized Brains. N.p., 08 Feb. 2012. Web. 11 May 2015.

 

Marley, Marie. “Do Crossword Puzzles Really Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?” The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 24 Feb. 2015. Web. 11 May 2015.

One comment

  1. kaufmana

    I’m a little confused. In one place, you say, “Scientists say after the tests that people who keep their minds active and educated have less protein that forms beta amyloid plaques, which create diseases.”

    That sounds like learning new things helps prevent Alzheimer’s disease. But then you say “keeping your brain active does not help.”

    Are the scientists wrong? If so, why? Can you explain more about how Alzheimer’s disease changes the brain with plaque on neural pathways?

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