I&S Connection Reflection

In this unit, we focused on the Industrial Revolution and its effects on our current world.

How would your learning experience have been different if you’d done it in a different country?

I think if I was back in Bangladesh, this unit would have gone down a completely different road. I say this because Bangladesh is still a developing country that is struggling with its systems and control over itself. Child labor in Bangladesh is still an immense issue and isn’t going to stop any time soon because of the rocketing poverty rates and growing population. Our school was very small and was barely an international school, with most of it made up of natives. Constantly talking about the issue of child labor and its problems would be talking about outside of the safe walls of school. People lived in slums and huts everywhere. I think it would have been harder to finish the unit because of the harsh reality the country is still living through. I don’t think I would have been as free to express my thoughts and beliefs as I am here, because I would always be frowned upon for disrespecting or stating the issues with their country.

What are you studying in another subject that is connected to this?

In English we learned about persuasive language and how to use it effectively. It think that helped us in this unit because in our summative, we were trying to persuade the judge (Ms.Madrid) into agreeing with our side of the argument. I think it gave us a stronger chance to be on the winning side of the debate. Another connection with school is in music. In music we are learning about blues music and its deep history. It was a way for poorer people and slaves to have a safe way to emote without getting into trouble. I think that relates to the Industrial Revolution because there were many people going through poverty and rough times because of the sudden change in the environment and people.

Child Labor Trial – Persuasive Paragraph and Biography

A Brief Biography of James Hardy:
Written by: Sophia Pichardo and Koumae Adams

James Hardy is a factory owner that produced textiles. He is fully against the use of underaged children in factories; a term that’s called child labor. James Hardy was born in Winchester into a wealthy family. His grandfather owned a factory. He helped with the machines and learned how to run a it at young age. His grandfather later died by illness, and James inherited the factory at age of 27. He tries to run his factory in a morally honest and fair way, but unfortunately, child labor in the 1700’s – 1800’s is almost inevitable and hard to avoid. Instead of overworking and using the children as slaves, he compromised and only hired 14-15 year olds and up, reducing their work hours by many and providing safe and hospitable environments for them to rest, work and live in. It is proven that workers who have fewer hours can produce more content, which leads to better economical production. To keep his business blooming at competitive prices, he tried to convince other factory owners to follow his example of how he treated his employees, similar to John Wood. James Hardy has improved the lives of many kids who would have suffered through unjust employment.

Persuasive Paragraph:

Child labor is morally wrong and should not be accepted under any circumstances. Children who work in factories for 12-15 hours a day are unhealthy and can develop very severe issues, both mentally and physically as a result.
Children should keep their innocent childhoods alive and should avoid going to factories and enduring harsh punishments and environments. Most of the children who went through child labor had to deal with cruel punishments, painful injuries, and many others. In conclusion, child labor isn’t smiled upon and should be stopped.

Empathy Map:

Industrial Revolution

What was the most important aspect of the Industrial Revolution?

Coal extraction was the most important part of the Industrial
Revolution, and without it, life today would not be the same. Without the extraction of coal, things like steam engines, machines, iron, and metal devices would not be present and active in modern time. Coal extraction changed the way materials were produced and delivered by powering machines and transportation to efficiently finish the job. Industrial production would still be developing if coal extraction wasn’t used as a tool to help polish and improve the way the systems worked. Agricultural produce was transported to the city or the industries by trains/the railways which are made from iron smelting, that run on steam power, which would not be possible without coal extraction. It’s all a system that connects and at times there are doubts on what started it all, but without coal extraction, most of the major aspects of the Industrial Revolution could not exist.


Empires End Unit Reflection

Backward-Looking: How much did you know about the subject before we started?

I didn’t really know much about the subject of Spain colonizing Cuba. I knew it happened in history and that’s all. But when I started researching with Evan I found out that it affected my country (the Dominican Republic) as well, and that my culture was similar because it was conquered by Spain as well. It was really interesting and it showed me that things are connected even when you can’t see it at first.

Inward-Looking: What was especially satisfying to you about either the process or the finished product?

The process of making the powerpoint was a long one. I thought it would be easy and we could just find images, site them, and put them on the powerpoint and that was that. But the CC Search was introduced and that made things a bit harder. I wasn’t used to it so I would search my topic and find images that I wanted but they wouldn’t always be available or I would forget to use it and find the perfect image and get all excited but my partner would ask me if it was from CC Search and….it wasn’t. So my first experience with CC Search was a bit rocky but in the future I think it will be easier to use and be super helpful. So that’s what I found satisfying in the end. Seeing all the beautiful cited pictures in the powerpoint.

Outward-Looking: Did you do your work the way other people did theirs? 

We did our work slightly different than most people. I didn’t notice this at first but when we were seeing all of the end results I found that ours was different that everyone’s, excluding the one or two other pairs that looked the same. I don’t think that affects our grade, but it was kind of surprising seeing that people interpreted the instructions and TSC differently. We were also a little behind and that kind of made me nervous because everyone was doing the next step and we were still struggling with research, but we put in extra effort during bre ak and we easily caught up with everyone else.

Forward-Looking: What would you change if you had the chance to do the piece over again?

If we had to do this task/unit over again I would probably make a few changes to the process. I was nervous that we wouldn’t complete it on time and I wasn’t quite happy with how the work was distributed. But once things were speeding up, I knew I could rely on my partner to do things we needed or to help complete a part. I think I would make an action plan or set goals for class time so that everything would be planned out and there would be no panic.

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https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0zb_6ZXcNa4ejdsVlBfZlNkaXc/view?usp=sharing