Should everybody learn to code?

It’s a good question. Is there an easy answer?

  1. Program or Perish: Why Everyone Should Learn to Code
  2. Should Everybody Learn to Code?
  3. Maybe Not Everybody Should Learn to Code
  4. Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds
  5. No, Not Everyone Needs to Learn to Code – But Here’s What They Should Know
  6. Please Don’t Learn to Code

In groups, divide up the reading and share what each articles says. Come up with your own argument as to whether or not you think everybody should learn to code.

Educational Game Design

What most schools don’t teach

As we learned from the video above, very few schools are teaching computer programming at a time when there will be more and more demand for people with computer coding experience. This project is an opportunity for you to explore the concept of coding while also using the Design Cycle to help you create a program that fulfills a purpose.

In addition to exploring the Scratch programming language and community, we will also be taking the time to “interview” students in the elementary school to get an idea of what their interests are as well as what content is appropriate.

Your task will be to design and create a simple game or activity using Scratch that can be used in the elementary school classrooms to help them learn or reinforce what they have been learning. It can be a math game, a reading quiz or maybe even a Japanese lesson. Whatever you decide to make, you should strive to make it the right level of difficulty and the right level of interest for your audience.

Statement of Inquiry:

Computer game design requires a combination of programming, story telling, and art.

Inquiry Questions:

  • Factual: How can we learn to use Scratch?
  • Debatable: Are computer games a good way to teach and/or learn in school?
  • Conceptual: How does art, technology, design and storytelling combine to make a good computer game?

Related Posts

Educational Game Design

Unit Question:

How can we create a simple computer program that keeps the needs of the user in mind?

Area of Interaction:

Human Ingenuity

  • Awareness and Understanding of the individual desire to create, develop or change things
  • Reflection on the products of innovation, creation and development in context
  • Taking action to create solutions and products to solve own and others’ problems

Significant Concept:

Design is about the user and not the designer.

As we learned from the Hour of Code, very few schools are teaching computer programming at a time when there will be more and more demand for people with computer coding experience. This project is an opportunity for you to explore the concept of coding while also using the Design Cycle to help you create a program that fulfills a purpose.

In addition to exploring the Scratch programming language and community, we will also be taking the time to “interview” kindergarten students in the elementary school to get an idea of what their interests are as well as what content is appropriate.

Your task will be to design and create a simple game or activity using Scratch that can be used in the kindergarten classrooms to help them learn or reinforce what they have been learning. It can be a math game, a reading quiz or maybe even a Japanese lesson. Whatever you decide to make, you should strive to make it the right level of difficulty and the right level of interest for your audience.

Investigation #1: Getting to know Scratch