Introduction to page design

In this session, we will learn some key terms and some core design principles. For reference, the key terms are:

  • DPS – Double page spread – two facing pages
  • Caption – The copy that explains the who, what, where, when, how and why of action in a photo; plan space for every photo to have a caption!
  • COB – Cut out background – a photo where the background is removed (e.g. in Photoshop)
  • Dominant element – The largest eye-catching photo or collection of photos or elements on a spread. Often this will ‘sit’ or ‘hang’ on the eye-line and sit across the gutter, providing unity to the spread.
  • External margin – A frame of white or empty space that will frame the edges of the spread
  • Internal margin – A consistent amount of white space between elements on a page; usually one pica.
  • Copy – All the text on a spread – includes captions, headlines, stories. The copy tells the story of the year.
  • Eye-line – A one pica horizontal line that connects the left and right pages. Usually this is about 1/3 or 2/3 the way down a page. All elements should either sit on top of or hang below this line.
  • Bleed – When pictures or text extend right the way to the end of the page.
  • Headline – Words set in large type that attracts the reader to a spread. Traditionally set above copy blocks.
  • White space / negative space –  The absence of any element.
  • Gutter – The space where the left and right pages meet. Often one or two picas wide and folded as the book comes together.
  • Type / typography – Printed letters and characters
  • Logo – Artwork to represent a company; can also unify a yearbook
  • Pica – A journalistic unit of measurement, one pica=1/6 of an inch or 4.23 mm.

We will also learn at the following design principles.

Here is an example template created using these design principles in InDesign! Screen Shot 2015-09-16 at 4.17.44 pmLink

Now it is your turn. Starting working on your own page…

  1. Download the template.
  2. Organise the pages – double page spread? Or single left? Single right?
  3. Use the following guides to design a layout for the page. Use shapes for photograph placeholders and text boxes for headings, captions and copy.
    1. The 10 Rules of Yearbook Design
    2. 8 column layout design made easy

Welcome back! (YIS: 2017-2018)

Hi there!

My name is Mr Hutton, and I will be your English teacher this year. Yoroshiku onegaishimasu! By way of introduction, I attach a photo of myself and Kenta (my son). He likes eating muffins, yoghurt, and playing with toy cars! (I also like such things…)

Welcome (back) to YIS for the 2017-2018 academic year! I hope you all had a restful and refreshing summer break. I am looking forward to seeing all the returning students as well as meeting the new – I hope you too will enjoy YIS!

I will be sharing individual student folders with you shortly, which you will use to organise your files and submit work. In the meantime, you might like to bookmark this blog. Also, don’t forget to add the subject share folder to your Google Drive – it is how I share everything with the class so it is really important! (If you don’t know how to do this I will go through it in class…)

This is a good starting point, but as we work through the year you will need to check out the relevant page for the unit you will be studying. Will will also be using Google Classroom this year, but I will introduce this during class time.

To access individual unit pages, choose your class —> Grade X —–> Unit XXXX to find the correct unit page. Units are split into individual lessons, which you can click on the links for. Extra resources are also included on these pages.

There is so much fun and learning on the way this year and I am really looking forward to it. Can’t wait to meet you all next week! Let’s have an exciting year!