Analysing Texts – ‘The Big 5’

To analyse means to break down in order to bring out the essential elements or structure.

 1. Audience and Purpose
Context of composition

– Describe the time and place that this text was produced in.
– Who wrote the text?
– Why was the text produced? (purpose)  What makes you say this?

Intended audience
– Who was this text aimed at?  How can you tell?

Context of interpretation / reception
– What are your circumstances? (time and place)
– How do these factors influence your reading of the text?

2. Content and Theme
Content is what is in a text.  Themes are more what a text is about (big ideas).

 – Describe what is going on in the text (key features).
– What is this text about?
– What is the author’s message?
– What is the significance of the text to its audience?
– What is the text actually saying?

3. Tone and Mood
Tone refers to the implied attitude of the author of a text and the ‘voice’ which shows this attitude.  Mood refers more to the emotional atmosphere that is produced for a reader when experiencing a text.

– What is the writer’s tone?
– How does the author sound?
– What kind of diction does the author use to create this tone?
– How does the text make the reader feel? (mood)
– How does the diction contribute to this effect?

4. Stylistic Devices
Style refers to the ‘how’ of a text – how do the writers say whatever it is that they say? (e.g. rhetorical devices, diction, figurative language, syntax etc…)

– What stylistic devices does the writer use?  What effects do these devices have on a reader?

5. Structure / Layout
Structure refers to the form of a text.

– What kind of text is it?  What features let you know this?
– What structural conventions for that text type are used?
– Does this text conform to, or deviate from, the standard conventions for that particular text type?

Schools of literary criticism

While it may not be that useful at the moment, the following site will definitely come in handy when we begin to look at literature later this year.

There are also handy guides on reading, analysing and writing poetry.  Also, there is a section on subject-specific writing that may come in handy for other subjects.

Have a look when you get some time.  I hope it comes in handy later this year!

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/722/1/

 

Learning how to learn: one stop resource!

Looking to learn some useful techniques on how to manage your time?  How about some tips on research?  Or maybe you need some help with reading and writing?

Whatever it is you are looking to improve, you can find it at the following site.  It really is a great collection that addresses many approaches to learning.

Check it out, and let me know if you find any part of the site particularly helpful in the comments below.

http://www.studygs.net/

 

Ever wanted to try your hand at writing a novel?

NaNoWriMo is the term given to the movement (and the organisation that supports it) that aims to encourage people to have a go at writing a novel.  It stands for ‘National Novel Writing Month.’ Every year, it is growing in popularity with eager writers in primary schools, secondary schools and beyond taking up the challenge.

If you have always wanted to try and write a novel, but lacked the motivation or guidance, this could be for you!  Check it out and let me know if you decide to do it – I would be happy to help you with brainstorm or drafting as well!

http://nanowrimo.org/

 

So many key linguistic terms and concepts to remember…

There are quite a number of key literary terms and concepts out there, and we come across these unfamiliar terms quite frequently.  This is a nice glossary to consult for reliable and useful information (much better than the Internet, which can be quite inconsistent!).

Abrams, Meyer H., and Geoffrey Galt. Harpham. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Tenth Edition ed. Boston, Mass. [u.a.: Thomson Wadsworth, 2012. Print.

If you happen to find a reliable Internet site, post it in the comments section below!