Researching Baroque Music

Giovanni Paolo Panini [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Reading about Baroque period musical instruments

Grade 8 Music is currently researching the Baroque period of music, which, according to Encyclopaedia Britannica, was “one of the most dramatic turning points in the history of music” when it began in Italy in 1600.

Need resources for this? Visit our Grade 8 Baroque Music LibGuide. There are library books, tutorials for Encyclopaedia Britannica and Oxford Music Online, resources for citations and paraphrasing and more.

Oxford Music Online is an outstanding resource for music related research. Learn more about how to navigate it by watching this 8 minute tutorial.

“Baroque music.” Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 19 Aug. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/high/article/Baroque-music/623352. Accessed 20 Feb. 2017.

New Research Resource: Churchill Archive

The YIS library has added a new research resource, one which I&S and History students will find particularly useful: the Churchill Archive. As described on the Churchill Archive’s about page,

Published in October 2012 by Bloomsbury Publishing in collaboration with the Churchill Archives Centre, the Churchill Archive is a digital library of modern international history. It includes more than 800,000 pages of original documents, produced between 1874 and 1965, ranging from Winston S. Churchill’s personal correspondence to his official exchanges with kings, presidents, politicians, and military leaders. This is more than a fantastic collection of primary source material; it is a unique online resource offering new insight into a fascinating period of our past.

While on the school network, students can freely access the Churchill Archive without logging in. If you want to use this resource at home, visit the library research portal for the username and password.

Interested? Take ten minutes to watch the tour so you can get the most out of this excellent digital library.

Notice you can register for a MyArchive account, a personalised account within the Archive which will allow you to save your searches and favourite documents. To create an account, you should be logged in to the Churchill Archive, then visit the Sign-in page where you will see a link at the bottom of the page to register for a My Archive account.

Happy Researching!

Cite it Right!

Why do we cite?

As exhibition approaches, Grade 5 has been continuing to develop their research skills in preparation for their independent inquiry project. This week the Grade 5 students were introduced to creating bibliographies in MLA style. We discussed why how we cite before practicing making citations for new books about science experiments.

Where can we find information for our citations?

After they understood the philosophy behind citation and practiced making citations by hand, the students were introduced to RefME, a powerful citation tool new to the YIS community. Anyone with a YIS email can create an account with RefME.  Watch this space for more information about RefME as we roll it out over the next few weeks.

Want to learn a little more about how to cite your sources according to the 8th edition of MLA? Check out our Grade 5 Citation Guide.

Grade 10: Edo Period Research

Today we will be working on exploratory research for your historical investigation on the Edo period of Japan. Effective researchers use a variety of academic sources in their research. To start, you can use Wikipedia for academic research, but maybe not in the way that you think. Watch this video to see how Wikipedia can be your trampoline into databases and digital libraries.

Now that you’ve developed a list of search terms, keywords, people and dates, it’s time to dive into the real academic resources. Do you know NOTHING about your topic beyond the quickie Wiki overview? Get background information on your topic by searching Encyclopaedia Britannica. (The first two minutes are most relevant to you. After that it gets kind of promotion-y.) You can access Encyclopaedia Britannica by going to our new YIS Library Research Portal. Get the password from your librarian.

Once you’ve got a basic understanding of your topic, it’s time to research using more sophisticated academic tools. Watch the tutorials and complete the “scavenger hunt” for these resources.

After this session, your class is going to be well prepared for next weeks’ field trip. Share something you learned today on our Padlets:

Interesting Edo Research padlet – Group 1

Interesting Edo research padlet – Group 2

Please fill out this short survey on today’s session.

Extended Essay: Planning your research

Using the Big6 research model to frame and plan your research will lead to a more successful Extended Essay, particularly when it’s time to write your rough draft. This EE session will focus on the first two steps and touch on the third step.

Task Definition

Screen Shot 2016-02-28 at 9.54.47 AMIt’s essential to start your research by identifying your information problem and determining the information you’ll need to solve that problem. Start by completing the Task Definition sheet. Still between topics? Fill out two!

Have you read a sample essay yet? Visit the YIS EE Libguide and read a sample paper now. Seeing how others used information will help you determine what you need to know. Mine their bibliographies and see what kind of information successful EEs in your subject area cited.

Information Seeking Strategies

Screen Shot 2016-02-28 at 9.57.39 AMOnce you’ve determined what kind of information you need, now you have to figure out the absolute best possible sources to get that information. Dream big! Think of all the possibilities if there were no geographical or financial constrictions. Then brainstorm alternatives for sources that just can’t be accessed.

Start by filling out the YIS Research Planner. Think as broadly as possible. Aim for expert. Aim for variety. You will narrow down later, but it’s best to start broadly.

It’s great to start with Wikipedia as a trampoline into other resources. Step 2 is good time to review relevant Wikipedia articles for academic research, but remember you can’t use them on your bibliography. You need to be looking at authoritative, reliable resources. Make sure you evaluate all of your resources using the CRAAP method.

Location and Access

Screen Shot 2016-02-28 at 9.39.12 AMNow that you’ve figured out which resources will be your best resources, it’s time to actually get your hands on them. This means two things:

1. Starting an Annotated Bibliography

It is essential you keep an organized list of your resources, preferably in MLA format, as you conduct your research. Updating an annotated MLA bibliography as you research will ensure you never lose a source, have a snapshot of your research at all times, and are ready to cite any resource when you begin writing your paper. Each resource should include a full MLA citation followed by a paragraph, summarizing the content of the resource, evaluating the resource, and reflecting on its overall fit into your project. Visit the Purdue OWL for more information on annotated bibliographies and don’t forget our citation guide to make sure you get the MLA just right.

2. Effectively using library resources

The library subscribes to a variety of electronic resources to help you find reliable academic resources for your research. Using Ebscohost databases and JSTOR gives you access to materials you might have to pay to access otherwise.

  1. Ebscohost Tutorials
  2. JSTOR Tutorials

Another resource that can be useful if Google’s specialized search engine Google Scholar. Read Google Scholar’s About Us page and their Search Tips to get the most out of your experience.

Research Tutorials: JSTOR

How to Use JSTOR by JSTOR.org
How to Use JSTOR by JSTOR.org

JSTOR is an online academic library that allows you access to journal articles, primary source documents and books. It is appropriate for DP research, particularly the Extended Essay, as well as some upper MYP research. Here’s a 1 minute video overview of searching JSTOR.

JSTOR in a minute: Search Tips from JSTOR on Vimeo.

Prefer more detail? This slideshow walks you through the basics of researching with JSTOR, including basic searches, advanced searches, organizing your results and using MyJSTOR.

JSTOR has recently expanded their eBook collection, and they’re quite proud of it. The video below gives a one minute overview of eBooks in JSTOR; watch it and learn how to make eBooks work for you.

Researching with Ebscohost: Tutorials

Research :Mediterranean Center of Medical Sciences under CC BY 2.0
Flickr Photo “Research :Mediterranean Center of Medical Sciences” by MCMScience Mediterranean under CC BY 2.0

EBSCOhost is a powerful online reference system accessible via the Internet. It offers a variety of proprietary full text databases and popular databases from leading information providers. EBSCOhost offers customizable basic and advanced searching supported by Boolean logic, natural language, enhanced subject indexing and journal searching. With links from the full record display to related articles by subject, magazine issue or author, users can further explore their topic. In addition, EBSCOhost allows patrons to print, email or download multiple articles.

To learn more about how to use this resource, watch the EBSCOhost tutorials below.