Month: December 2015 (page 1 of 2)

IB 11 and 12 Holiday Homework (No homework for Gr 8 and 9)

In addition you should watch a (1) documentary film related to an issue we have studied (or will study) in class and be ready to discuss it during the first class of January.

Here are some suggestions, but you can rent a DVD or browse sites like youtube or   http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/ if you want to find something that really interests you.

Remember, the course topics are:

  • P1: Population in Transition
  • P1: Disparities in Wealth in Development
  • P1: Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability
  • P1:Patterns in resource consumptions
  • P2: Oceans and their Coastal Margins
  • P2: Hazards and Disasters
  • P2: The Geography of Food and Health (HL only)
  • P3: HL extension: Globalization (see all topics in IB guide) (HL only)

Here are a few suggestions

Addicted to Aid (disparity, HL extension, food)

Demographic Winter (population)

Earthlings (food)

Acidic Oceans (coasts)

Life and Debt (development, aid, financial flows, disparity)

Welcome to Lagos. (development, urbanization, disparity)

China from the Inside (development, disparity)

How the Banks Won (financial flows) (HL)

Sicko (health, disparity)

The Inside Job (financial flows, development, disparity)

The Oil Factor (financial flows, resources, environment)

Fuel (financial flows, resources, environment)

Manufactured Landscapes (development, disparity)

Flow: For Love of Water (food, development, environment, disparity)

Deep sea (coasts)

The Death of Oceans (coasts)

The Cove (coasts)

The 11th Hour (resources, environment)

Earth: The Climate Wars (environment)

The End of the Line (coasts, food)

Syria, Songs of Defiance (violence), (Disparity, HL extension)

Occupation 101: Voices of the silent Majority (violence), (Disparity, HL extension)

The Future of Food (food and health)

What in the World are they Spraying?  (Food and health)
 
The World According to Monsanto (food and health)

Fast Food, Fat Profits  (food and health)

Super Hurricanes (hazards)

When the levees broke (hazard)

NOVA: Japan’s Killer quake (hazards)

Then and Now: Ishinomaki (hazards)

Inside Tchernobyl (hazards, HL extension)

The Battle of Chernobyl (Hazards, HL extension)

Chernobyl Heart (Hazards, HL extension)

Arctic Meltdown lecture (coasts)

Battle for the Arctic (coasts)

Have a wonderful holiday! Get lots or rest and have fun!!!!

IB 11: The Spread of Disease

IB Expectations: Explain how the geographic concepts of diffusion by relocation and by expansion apply to the spread of diseases. Examine the application of the concept of barriers in attempts to limit the spread of diseases. Describe the factors that have enabled reduction in incidence of a disease.

Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 10.34.34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Ebola?

 See more detailed explanation here 

How has it spread? See also: Here

Barriers to Ebola:

June 2014: MSF: Outbreak is out of control

December 2014: MSF says international community is not doing enough not 

Washington Post: What is needed?

allAfrica: Sierra Leone declared Ebola Free See also BBC report

BBC: UK Government sets fund to fight Ebola (and Malaria)

Tech Times: Ebola is Back in Liberia

Activity: As a group, we will create a mini case study on the spread and control of Ebola:

  • What is Ebola? How is it transmitted? What are the symptoms? What are the causes?
  • Explain the geographic concepts of diffusion by relocation and expansion of the recent Ebola outbreak. Where did it start, where did it spread and how did it spread? Use the vocabulary learned last class.
  • Barriers: What are the geographic barriers to Ebola? What human barriers have been put in place thus far for the Ebola outbreak? Classify them?
  • Describe the factors that have enabled reduction in incidence of Ebola in a specific region

Here is the Summative Assessment you will be working on after the holidays.

IB 11 and 12 Holiday Homework (No homework for Gr 8 and 9)

In addition you should watch a (1) documentary film related to an issue we have studied (or will study) in class and be ready to discuss it during the first class of January.

Here are some suggestions, but you can rent a DVD or browse sites like youtube or   http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/ if you want to find something that really interests you.

Remember, the course topics are:

  • P1: Population in Transition
  • P1: Disparities in Wealth in Development
  • P1: Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability
  • P1:Patterns in resource consumptions
  • P2: Oceans and their Coastal Margins
  • P2: Hazards and Disasters
  • P2: The Geography of Food and Health (HL only)
  • P3: HL extension: Globalization (see all topics in IB guide) (HL only)

Here are a few suggestions

Addicted to Aid (disparity, HL extension, food)

Demographic Winter (population)

Earthlings (food)

Acidic Oceans (coasts)

Life and Debt (development, aid, financial flows, disparity)

Welcome to Lagos. (development, urbanization, disparity)

China from the Inside (development, disparity)

How the Banks Won (financial flows) (HL)

Sicko (health, disparity)

The Inside Job (financial flows, development, disparity)

The Oil Factor (financial flows, resources, environment)

The End of Oil (resources)

The Curse of Oil (Resources)

The Great Challenge: Oil (Resources)

Fuel (financial flows, resources, environment)

Manufactured Landscapes (development, disparity)

Flow: For Love of Water (food, development, environment, disparity)

Deep sea (coasts)

The Death of Oceans (coasts)

The Cove (coasts)

The 11th Hour (resources, environment)

Earth: The Climate Wars (environment)

The End of the Line (coasts, food)

Syria, Songs of Defiance (violence), (Disparity, HL extension)

Occupation 101: Voices of the silent Majority (violence), (Disparity, HL extension)

The Future of Food (food and health)

What in the World are they Spraying?  (Food and health)
 
The World According to Monsanto (food and health)

Fast Food, Fat Profits  (food and health)

Super Hurricanes (hazards)

When the levees broke (hazard)

NOVA: Japan’s Killer quake (hazards)

Then and Now: Ishinomaki (hazards)

Inside Tchernobyl (hazards, HL extension)

The Battle of Chernobyl (Hazards, HL extension)

Chernobyl Heart (Hazards, HL extension)

Arctic Meltdown lecture (coasts)

Battle for the Arctic (coasts)

Have a wonderful holiday! Get lots or rest and have fun!!!!

IB11: Intro to disease: Global Patterns

IB outcomes:

  • Explain the global distribution of diseases of affluence.
  • Explain the global distribution of diseases of poverty.

Vocabulary review:

  • Hale: Health Adjusted Life Expectancy: Number of years in full health that a newborn can expect ct to live (minus disease and injury)
  • Incidence (epidemiology): number of confirmed cases annually
  • Prevalence: number of cases per 10 000 pop

Exercise:

1. Complete this google doc

2. Rank all of these diseases on the epidemiological transition model from 1>5 on the first table the doc in #1

3. Can you classify diseases in terms of socio-economic prevalence?

If time, read Codrington p. 443 to 459

IB 12: Adjustment and Response to Hazard and Disasters

Preparedness adjustments:

Modify the event:

Modify loss:

Quick, 1 per table group.

1. Distinguish between rescue, rehabilitation and reconstruction response

2. Find one example the following in relation to either earthquakes, droughts, hurricanes or the BP oil spill, either before or after the event. 

  1. Assessment method of risk of a specific hazard event
  2. Preparedness adjustment
  3. Modify a hazard event
  4. Modifying loss

3: Fill out this document. 

 Summative Assessment

You will split into three groups. Each group will be responsible for completing the Assessment, Response and Adjustment part of each of our case studies.

  1. 3/11 or Haiti earthquake
  2. Hurricane Katrina
  3. The 2012 California drought
  4. The Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill

You will create a 5 – 10 minute presentation and a one page factsheet answering the following questions:

  1. Describe the risk assessment that was done prior to the disaster event?
  2. Explain what was done, if anything to limit the hazard event itself?
  3. Describe strategies designed to limit the damage and vulnerability from the hazard event. (insurance, zoning, government policies, education etc)
  4. To what extent were the residents prepared for such an event?
  5. Explain how these responses were affected by individual and community perceptions?
  6. List the short-term, mid-term and long-term responses after the event
  7. Discuss the importance of re-assessing risk, and re-examining vulnerability, following the disaster
  8. If the same event happened tomorrow in the same location, would the damage be greater or less? Explain your answer.
  • Make sure to include, maps, graphs, MLA sourcing and proper vocabulary.
  • You will have 4 double blocks to work on your presentation.
  • You will peer assess your presentation based on the IB rubric, and include clear comments as to why you gave your peers this grade.
  • Include your groups, study notes and presentation here
  • Email me if you have any questions
  • Presentations will be on Monday January 18th.

InS 9: Creating a Psych Experiment

Warmup: Now with our knowledge of the concepts of prosocial behaviour, altruism, and bystanderism we are going to look at ways in which we could study helping behaviour or not helping behaviour in different cultures.  Read the handout on Cross-cultural differences in prosocial behaviour (Law et al 257-258): What did Levine et al find out?  What did Whiting and Whiting discover?  What are the values and limitations of these studies?

As you watch the video, consider the validity of the study. Can you find some flaws? What is missing? How many people should be tested to make it valid? Are there other variables that were not mentioned? Are there biases?

Brainstorming: Make some assumptions first before starting your investigation: What country’s people or what ethnic group do you think are more likely to help?  Individualist or collectivist cultures?  What gender?  What age group? What factors are influencing them to help?

Now with a partner answer the following questions:

1. How does a researcher measure prosocial behaviour?

2.  Can we translate behaviours across cultures?

3.  Can we really generalize about an entire culture?

4.  Can we attribute meaning to a person’s refusal to help?

5.  Should all research be done in the field in a naturalistic setting to ensure ecological validity?

Task: With a partner design a study that will test helping behaviour across two different cultures.  Choose a specific helping behaviour that you are going to focus on (be original), and justify your decision.  How would you overcome the possible problems in identified in questions 1-5 above?  This part of the research process is called the Method and we are looking for you to design the study/experiment and describe the procedure of how you would conduct it.  Answer who, what, when, where, why and how as you plan.  How many participants do you need?  How are you going to collect and collate the data?  We will have class time today and Monday to work on it and present our ideas to the class on Tuesday for feedback.

Link your work here

 

IB 11: Sustainable Agriculture

  • Examine the concept of sustainable agriculture in terms of energy efficiency ratios and sustainable yields.

As you watch, consider the environmental, social and economic benefits and drawbacks of Organic Farming.

Question: Would you consider subsistence faring organic? Is it sustainable?

Agribusiness vs Sustainable farming.

What are the benefits and shortcomings of this sustainable farm:

Industrail family farm

Review:

  • Food Males
  • HALE

Further reading:

Youwill have read Codrington p. 440 to 443 by tomorrow

See also: this article

IB 11: Food. Addressing imbalances

We have discussed the benefits and drawbacks of food aid. In the Core unit 2, Disparities in Wealth ad Development, we discussed the benefits and drawbacks of trade and market access.

Instead of food aid, many economists and NGOs have pointed to trade as the best way to alleviate poverty and hunger in LEDCs. The problem is that trade is not always regulated and does not always benefit all parties involved equally.

Each of you will read one of the following articles. And explain it’s content to the class.

Section 1: Fair Trade

What is Fair Trade?

Child Labor in Fair Trade

Climate Change and Fair Trade

Access to Finance and Fair Trade

Current Issues in Fair Trade

Fair Trade is good for business

Section 2: Aid

Is trade, not aid, the answer for Africa?

Tough times as a cocoa trader

Aid isn’t the answer: Africa must be allowed to trade its way out of Poverty

OXFAM on Aid

Section 3: Market Access

Famine in Ethiopia Wars, Drought and Flawed Food Aid

A revolution Marches on Its Stomach

Subsidies, Food Security and Eating Right

The Indignity of Industrial Tomatoes

In groups, answer the following question:

  • Fill in this table listing the benefits and drawbacks of each.
  • Prepare a short answer to this question:
    • How are food aid, free trade and increased market effective in reducing food shortages and food insecurity?

IB12: Human Induced Technological Hazard: BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

IB outcome: Explain the causes and impacts of any one recent human-induced hazard event or disaster.

  •  Gulf of Mexico: 25% of the US oil supply
  • Deepwater Horizon: Owned by Transocean, under a Marshall Island flag of convenience
  • Chartered by BP

144913-004-FFCDAC66 (1)

What happened:

Results:

  • April 20 2010
  • 3 leaks
  • 5000 barrels of oil released every day
  • 87 days to plug the leak

Complete part 1 of the shared document.  Start at 20:00

Ask yourself. Why did they not have a plan?

Part 2 Environmental and Social Impacts

Complete the rest of the document as we watch the following clips

Carl Safina: The Oil Spill’s Unseen Villain start at: 9:00

Vice: Crude Awakening start at 3:00 to 12:00

Further reading:

The Eight Failures that Caused the BP Oil Spill

Gross Negligence caused the Spill

Impact Assessment

Five Years Later

Judge Approves $5 Billion fine

Post CS exercise:

Now that we have all of our CS, create a table with scales of 1 to 5 for each of the following and place all four hazards on it.

  • spatial extent

  • predictability

  • frequency

  • magnitude

  • duration

  • speed of onset

InS 9: Bystanderism continued

Part 1: Discuss Ted Talk 

Part 2:

Re-examine the factors that influence bystanderism using the reading guide. Make a copy of the document and explain the following factors and give one example that influence bystanderism.

Hyperlink your document here. 

Part 3: 

Here’s a film clip about a child abduction showing the bystander effect.

Besides the diffusion of responsibility ,what other factors might be influencing the situation.

Part 4:

View the quick film clip on the Matthew Carrington situation

Ask yourself why no one took any action and write a quick synopsis of the events on your blog.  Be confident in your ability to examine the major factors that influence bystanderism and back up your argument with empirical evidence.  Be familiar with the minor factors. Hyperlink your blogpost here. (post #5)

Homework: Watch this clip done by students at Boston University in 1976-77 and another by high school students regarding who would help a student passed out on the floor.

Older posts

© 2017 Geography Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar