Part 1: History, what is it good for?

First we will read; A Point Of View: What is history’s role in society? and have a socratic debate about the definition and role of history in our lives. 

  • How do we research history?
  • How do we know what “really” happened in the past?
  • How can we evaluate the quality of our sources?
  • Is there value in “bad” sources?
  • How does history change over time?
  • How does history affect:
    • us
    • our community
    • our society
    • our global interactions?

Part 2: You will have to pick a topic for your upcoming project. Consider the many different perspectives in history and think of specific examples for each one:

  • Political history: the story of government, political leaders, electoral activities, the making of policy, and the interaction of branches of government
  • Diplomatic history: the study of the relations between nations, diplomats, and ideas of diplomacy
  • Social history: the study of ways and customs, of family, education, children, demography (population change), and voluntary institutions (churches, for example)
  • Cultural history: the study of language and its uses, of the arts and literature, sport, and entertainment, in constructing cultural categories
  • Economic history: the study of how an entire system of production and consumption (or of any of its parts) works, of markets, industry, credit, and working people at all levels of the system
  • Intellectual history: the study of ideology and epistemology, analyzing how ideas affect human actions and how the material world affects human ideas
  • People’s history:  history from below, or folk history is a type of historical narrative which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people rather than political and other leaders.
  • Can you think of others?

Part 3: How do we analyse sources? 

  • Quick review from grade 9 InS: What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source?
  • Introduction using these sources with an extra P for Perspective!  See powerpoint

Exercise: Find a political cartoon from any time in history. Write an OPPVL for it. About 2-3 sentences per aspect. Print both for a gallery walk. 

 

Here is a more detailed description of an OPPVL