Month: November 2017

InS 10 – Kamakura Beach Study Write-Up

Now that we have collected all of our data, it is time to put it all together.

First, make sure all of your paper data is inputed here

PART 2 – graphing results, analysis, conclusion and evaluation

Please use clear headings for these sections.

ANALYSIS

First you will graph your data in order to analyse your findings

* Note – Graphs can be computer generated or done by hand and must have titles, referred to and be integrated into the text, where you talk about them. You should use a variety of suitable graphs to display data. They must be clear, have labelled/numbered axis and titled. Be as creative as you want when illustrating all of your work.

Write your analysis under the headings of each Hypotheses. You will state what we expected with reference to our studies on coastal processes and landforms.( use what we have learned in class! ) You will analyse ( describe and explain ) the data you collected with regard to the expectations of a destructive beach, and state whether or not you have proved or disproved each hypothesis. DO NOT ANSWER THE RESEARCH QUESTION. You will do this in the conclusion. 

Graphing suggestions:

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  • Create a beach profile by graphing the angle of slope from each quadrat of your transect and analyse this bearing in mind what we know about a destructive profile (use class averages)
  • 3D graphing on Excel
  1. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  1. The waves will be high ( 1 metre or more ) and frequent ( more than 12 per minute )
  • Use a table or pictograph to illustrate the data and graph the 2 class averages.
  1. There will be a strong longshore drift
  • Analyse your findings referring to prevailing wind, direction of movement  and time taken for any movement of material over 10m. If it is over 3m per minute then it is considered strong.

         5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and evidence of Mitigation (man-made defences) which illustrate that show            the beach is being destroyed.

  • Using a field sketch and the observational notes you made as well as photographs present any evidence of the above. Use lots of photos and be creative here. Annotate your photographs to show what they illustrate.

CONCLUSION

Sum up what you found. Are your hypotheses mainly proven or disproven?  Go through each hypothesis and state whether it’s proved or disproved, based on the summary of your findings you will conclude and give your answer to the question: “ Is the beach at Kamakura Inmuragasaki a destructive beach?”

EVALUATION

Briefly evaluate (discuss positive and negatives)

  1. the methods and how these might have been improved (not the execution of your peers!)
  2. suggest how the study/methodology might be improved 
  3. how the study might be extended.

TSC for this  A, B, C & D

Hyperlink your work here

Due date: 

10A: Wednesday December 6th

10C: Tuesday December 5th

InS 9: Introduction to Social History

Columbus and the Native Americans.

In table groups, discuss the following questions:

  • What do you know about Christopher Columbus? What is your opinion of him?
  • What do you know about Native Americans, also called Indians
  • How did you learn about those things?
  • How do we know that the History we have learned is true?
  • Do Historians have an opinion about the topics they cover? Can they be biased?

Reading 1: Kennedy et al:

As you read, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of this text? Why was it written?
  • What is the author’s perspective in the text? What is the main message?
  • Highlight words or passage who seem to demonstrate a bias, or that could lead the reader to gain a certain opinion on the subject.

Now that we’ve read about the Indians and Columbus:

  • What would you say about them based on your reading?
  • What themes did the readings focus on?
  • If there is a bias, where does it come from and how is it manifested?
  • What information was not included in the text? Why do you think they historians chose to omit it?
  • How is our perception of History shaped by historians?

Reading 2: Zinn

As you read, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of this text? Why was it written?
  • What is the author’s perspective in the text? What is the main message?
  • Highlight words or passage who seem to demonstrate a bias, or that could lead the reader to gain a certain opinion on the subject.

Now that we’ve read a different perspective, discuss the following questions:

  • Has your perspective of Columbus and Native Americans changed after reading this text?
  • If there is a bias, where does it come from and how is it manifested?
  • What information was not included in the text? Why do you think Zinn chose to omit it?
  • What themes did the readings focus on? How do they differ from the Kennedy, David et al reading?
  • How is our perception of History shaped by historians?
  • Are certain types of sources less biased?

Exercise 1:

In groups of 2, you will write a one paragraph description of Columbus’ “discovery” of the Americas and Native Americans, with a clear bias for or against him.

  • Use words that will emphasize your opinion
  • Include/omit the information that will best serve your purpose
  • Do not make up facts!

Part 2: Watch the simple animated video history,

Columbus on trial

Discussion: 

  • How can you read history and be aware of biases?
  • If you were to write about Columbus, what themes would you focus on, knowing that you cannot write everything about everything?
  • What themes would you not include?
  • How to analyze sources
  • Primary and secondary sources

 

Assessment:

In groups of 2, you will now work on your

social history assessment

Write your team members and the specific members or group you will research here

© 2018 I&S Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar