Month: October 2018

InS 9: Introduction to Social History

Columbus and the Native Americans.

In table groups, discuss the following questions:

  • What do you know about Christopher Columbus? What is your opinion of him?
  • What do you know about Native Americans, also called Indians
  • How did you learn about those things?
  • How do we know that the History we have learned is true?
  • Do Historians have an opinion about the topics they cover? Can they be biased?

Part 1:

Reading 1: Kennedy et al:

As you read, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of this text? Why was it written?
  • What is the author’s perspective in the text? What is the main message?
  • Highlight words or passage who seem to demonstrate a bias, or that could lead the reader to gain a certain opinion on the subject.

Now that we’ve read about the Indians and Columbus.

Use a quote to support all answers

  • What is your opinion about them (the Indians and Columbus)  based on your reading?
  • What themes did the readings focus on?
  • If there is a bias, where does it come from and how is it manifested?
  • What kind of information was not included in the text? Why do you think they historians chose to omit it?

Further discussion:

  • How is our perception of History shaped by historians?
  • Are certain types of sources less biased?
  • Is there value in biased historical texts?

Reading 2: Howard Zinn (You will do this on your own while I am away)

  1. Make a copy of this document and put your name in the title
  2. Share the document with me AND hyperlink it here
  3. You have both periods to read the handout and answer all questions
  4. Due at the end of class

Part 2: Videos

Columbus on trial

What is the role of a historian?

  • If you were to retell a historical event, what would be the important questions you would want to answer?
  • How would you try to report accurate information?
  • What methods could you use do do this?

Here are a few methods used by historians:

  • Develop then test hypotheses (verify/falsify) (scientific method?)
  • Reconstruct the physical events
  • Develop a chronology
  • Reconstruct the ‘links’ between events and between the artefacts
  • Look for specific evidence to find the answer to a specific question
  • Test the consistency between the facts
  • Determine what is the relevant evidence
  • ‘Rethink’ the character’s actions
  • Determine what is ‘plausible’

Historians must consider ideas such as:

  • the degree to which the evidence is explained,
  • the quality of the connections between various facts,
  • the degree to which wild and unjustified claims are limited,
  • engagement with alternative interpretations and replies to those interpretations,
  • simplicity of explanation
  • Engagement of the narrative

This all connects to the methodology of History → how historians do History!

Part 3: Groupwork

In groups of 2, you will write a one paragraph description of Columbus’ “discovery” of the Americas and Native Americans, with a clear bias for or against him.

  • Use words that will emphasize your opinion
  • Include/omit the information that will best serve your purpose
  • Do not make up facts!
  • You will present your paragraph to the class.

Discussion: 

  • How can you read history and be aware of biases?
  • If you were to write about Columbus, what themes would you focus on, knowing that you cannot write everything about everything?
  • What themes would you not include?

Useful sources

Practice OPVL #1  with ATL component

InS8: Introduction to Development

In understanding why inequality exists between and within nations we must understand its history, geography and how power and resources come to be shared.

  • What do you understand about this statement of inquiry?
  • What do you already know about it?
  • What questions do you have about it?

Discussion Questions:

  • What is development?
  • Why is the world unequal?
  • Why are there poor countries and rich countries?
  • Is wealth the only way to measure development?
  • What is quality of life? How do you measure it?

Exercise 1:

Look at the Longman Student Atlas, p. 14 to 23

    • In groups of 4, look at the different choropleth maps and discuss the reason for the differences between countries
    • Find some trends of countries that seem to be “better off” or “worse off”?
    • Find exceptions to your trends?
    • Discuss how these maps can be misleading and/or biased?

What is HDI

Exercise 2:

Have a look at

In groups, come up with your own human development index. Pick between 2 and 4 indicators you believe will show how developed a country is, in comparaison to another.

You will then tabulate the data and create your own choropleth map, including:

  • A title
  • A key
  • At least 10 countries colored in
  • A brief explanation of the trend found in your map

Task 2:

-Choose 2 countries on Gapminder to research.

-Picking countries with varying levels of development will be easier to compare and contrast, but you are free to pick any 2 countries.

-Look up the following indicators for both countries:

  • Population growth
  • Infant Mortality Rate
  • GDP per capita
  • Human Development Index (HDI)
  • Fertility rate
  • Life expectancy
  • Literacy Rate

Blogpost

Write a blog post explaining the main differences you have noticed when looking at the indicators above. Can you explain why your two countries have such differences? Are the indicators interrelated? Explain your answer.

Hyperlink your post on this doc: 8B

If you are done, find a partner and carefully read each-other’s blogposts. Then, comment on their blogs. Give an overall assessment of the reflection by agreeing, disagreeing and asking questions to further the discussion.

InS 10 Field Trip: Kamakura Beach Study

On September 3rd, we will be going to Kamakura to conduct a few data collection experiments on Inamuragasaki beach in Kamakura.

On the day, you will either meet us:

What to bring:

  • Wear your YIS PE t-shirt
  • Your lunch (You will not be allowed to go to the store from the beach)
  • Water
  • Sunscreen and sunglasses
  • A camera or smartphone
  • Swimsuit and towel for those going in the water.

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The field trip has two main aims

  1. To familiarize you with the processes and landforms of the coastal environment and mitigation methods
  2. To conduct fieldwork required for a geographical investigation of a coastal zone

Our research question is:

“ Is Inamuragasaki beach a destructive beach?”

To help answer this we are gathering data on beach characteristics, beach material, gradient and waves, as well as making observations to decide whether or not it is destructive or constructive  

We will try to prove or disprove the following Hypotheses

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  2. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  3. The waves will be high ( 1 meter or more ) and frequent ( more than 13 per minute)
  4. There will be a strong longshore drift
  5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defenses) that the beach is being destroyed

Methodology

We will be working in class groups to make information sharing easier. There will be 8 transects. See map for transects and groups

Each class will be split into 4 groups and will rotate their tasks. See rotation and explanation. You will have a copy of this with you.

Since we will be going with Ms Wilson’s classes, here is our schedule for the day:

Time Task
Morning: 10:30 to 12:00 Tasks 2 and 3: Waves, Longshore Drift  and Observations
Afternoon: 12:30 – 2:00 Task 1 – Beach Material and Gradient

 

PART 1 – Introduction, location and method

Before we go, you need to have a good understanding of the area we are going to research, and of the methodology of our experiments

In groups of 3, you will need:

  • A title page – include your name
  • Contents page ( this will be done last)
  • Clear headings for each section – INTRODUCTION/LOCATION, METHOD etc
  • INTRODUCTION
    • A one paragraph description of the location (history, geographic location and site)
    • A hand drawn map of the beach, and another situating it in Japan
    • A brief introduction to the aims of the study
    • our research question
    • Your hypotheses with justification.
  • METHODOLOGY
    • You will explain, using visual aids (pictures or drawings) how to conducted each experiment
    • Including a brief justification ( why you think this method is appropriate )
    • Include a list of all the material needed, with pictures.
  • TSC – B & C
  • Due date: 

    • 10B: Nov 14
    • 10C: Nov 16

Data tabulation sheet

InS 10: Intro to Coastal Processes and Landforms, and Seminar week Homework

Here is your homework during Seminar week.

Read this handout and answer the following questions, by hand, with your name and clear labels:

  • Page  27 Activities, #1, 2, 3
    • Broken lines = dotted lines
  • Page 29 Activity, all 6 questions
  • Page 31 Activities, # 1, 2
  • Page 33 # 1 only

For class only, do not do the exercises below for seminar week homework homework

Our next unit will be about coastal processes and erosional landforms, leading to another field trip to Kamakura, but this time we will be collecting primary data about the Inamuragasaki Beach on November 2nd

  • What are waves?
  • Why do they come in different shapes and sizes?
  • What generates waves?
  • How do beaches form?
  • What different types of beaches are there?
  • Can you explain why they look different?
  • How do cliffs form?
  • What shapes mountains and coasts?

Part 1: Marine Processes presentation

Take detailed notes of the slide show

WAVES

Why are waves different?

The prefect wave?

ACTIVITY

In groups of 2 or 3, you will explain one of the following features:

  • Constructive wave
  • Destructive wave
  • Ocean swells
  • Rip currents
  • Billabong
  • Erosion
  • Corrasion
  • Hydraulic action
  • Corrosion
  • Longshore Drift

There’s a catch! Only one person in the group will be allowed to talk. The others will have to “act-out” your explanation without speaking.

Useful link,  or try using this reading,

We will present in 10 minutes at the end of class.

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InS9: Psychological Experiment on Memory

Part 2: Individual work

First, let’s tabulate the data in these data collection sheets

  1. Title Page includes the name of the experiment The Effect of Word Order on Memory: The Serial Position Effect centered and then in the lower left hand corner your name, your class and the date of submission on three separate lines
  2.  Abstract is written after the experiment and states what you are studying, the aim or purpose of the experiment you are conducting, a brief description of the method, some details about the participants, where the research was conducted, and briefly state your results. (1 paragraph)
  3.  Results : Graphs of your results with clear labels and titles, your results must also be clearly stated in written form in this section, including anomalies (2 graphs and a totla of 4 sentences)
  4.  Discussion: relates your results to the results of the study you are replicating, you state what your results mean in relation to your hypotheses, you state your conclusion, and how you would improve this study if you were to do it again (2 paragraphs)
  5. Appendix: Include a summary table of raw data in the appendix that you can refer to, as well as all of your calculations (Images of your data tables, with titles and numbers, and all calculations)
  6. Hyperlink your work here

TSC– C & D

Due: TBD

InS 8: Shinto Temple Visit

Tomorrow, we will go to  Iseyama Koutai Shinto Shrine in Sakuragicho. See also. 

Make sure to wear long pants and shoes, no shorts, skirts or sandals

Meet on the playground at 1:15PM

You are required to complete the handout before and during the field trip

About Shinto

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