Author: mckeownb (page 1 of 58)

InS 8: Development debates

Now that you have a good understanding of your country’s development, it is time to debate world issues.

Each of you will have a 60 second opening statement followed by an open debate about the questions below.

A few rules:

  • Always be respectful
  • Address people as “The delegate of…”
  • No personal pronouns: “I, you. we” Instead say the name of the country, or “the people of…”
  • Remember that this is not a competition. You are not trying to win the argument. You are looking for concensus without compromising your country’s interest.
  • Have a definition of development. It isn’t just GDP!
  • Use the SDGs if necessary

Questions:

  • LICs: Discuss the importance of education and technology in helping LICs develop.
  • MICs: Discuss how MICs can continue developing their economies without environmental degradation
  • HICs: Discuss how HICs have a historical debt towards ex-colonies to help them achieve sustainable development.

You will be graded on the ATLs of

  • Thinking: Based on your level of thinking and understanding of your country and of the global issues you discuss.
  • Communication: Based on how well you express your ideas, how respectful you are to others and on your overall tone durind the debate.

Groupings are here


Reflection

You will now write about this unit in your Online Reflection Journals.

There is no prescribed theme, as long as it is about the development unit, so reflect on any part of your learning that you deem relevant: You can write about a part of your learning that you feel was interesting and have something relevant to say, or that you can comment about the way you learned in this unit.

Here are a few  prompts , if you need them:

  • How did you work on your communication skills in this unit? be specific in terms of goals and objectives
  • How has your perspective of world issues (or world problems) changed through this unit?
  • What questions were not answered in this unit that you would like to know more about? How could you learn more about the topics you care about?
  • How are the SDGs a good/not so good way of tackling world issues. Give examples.
  • Discuss the real-world relevance of a specific topic you learned about in this class. How can you use your knowledge to make a difference?
  • What was the most difficult part of this unit, and how did you overcome the difficulty?
  • Discuss the debate experience. What did you like? Where did you struggle? What would you do differently if you could?

Hyperlink your reflection here

InS 10: Intro to Abnormality

Discuss:

  • What are phobias?
  • What causes phobias?
  • How are they treated?
  • Are they more nature or nurture?
  • What is the difference between fear and phobia?
  • What would you consider abnormal human behavior?
  • How can we measure such behavior?

Exercise 1:

  • Read the handout p. 161
  • In groups, explain the following ways of measuring abnormality and their evaluation, using specific examples:
    • Statistical infrequency
    • Deviation from social norms
    • Failure to function adequately
    • Deviation from ideal mental health

Let’s Kahoot it up!

Exercise 2: Models of abnormality


Model: A set of assumptions or concepts that help psychologists and/or scientists explain and interpret observations

  • Spells out basic assumptions and sets guidelines for investigation and treatment
  • Some may conflict with each other or be better suited for certain conditions

Exercise 2:

In groups, use the handout to explain the following models of abnormality, as well as their ethical and practical implications.

Do some research of an actual case study where your model has been used, and explain it to the class, using the model to structure your explanation.

  • Medical model
  • Psychoanalytic approach
  • Behavioral approach
  • Cognitive Approach
  • Humanistic approach

Exercise 3: Bias in Psychological studies

We will look at the Li-Repac Study (1980)

Friday afternoon movies: Crash Course Psychology

InS9: Social History Essay

Most history is written from the viewpoint of the victors not the vanquished and it usually focuses on major political and economic events.  However in this unit we want to focus on society and the common man or woman, a story that is inclusive and representative and that tells the story of one person or a group of people.  Most important is to focus on a unique group of people that have one thing in common and that you have no relation to:

  • US soldiers suffering from PTSD that served in Afghanistan
  • Trawling fishermen in the Atlantic Ocean
  • Rohingya refugees in Thailand
  • Carvers of wooden Buddhas from Japan
  • Rockabilly bands in Yoyogi Park
  • Any group of people you are interested in

You will find some stories that have been written about in newspapers, magazines, on personal blogs, but where can you go looking for more personal and primary sources?  Is there someone you could conduct an interview with or is there one that has already been conducted with someone in that group? Do some of these people keep an online journal or blog? For example you could start with the wanting to know more about child refugees, then narrow it down to a subgroup such as Syrian child refugees.  But through your research you discover that is too broad so you focus on one specific area In Turkey with many young Syrian refugees.

Now you need to come up with the three themes that you are going to talk about. They might be the lack of education, inadequate food, and the desire to go elsewhere. You will need at least 4 legitimate sources and one must be an interview that has been conducted with a member of the group, or an expert in the field.

It would be great if as source could be an interview you conduct.  You could contact an expert in the field and conduct an interview with them by e-mail.

Remember that social history delves into personal lives so we must be conscious as researchers that we are handling very sensitive information and looking at it through their lens of history.

Assessment: In-class essay

You will write a social history essay on one specific person or one group of people, looking for their voice and point of view to come through in your writing along with their story.  

Part 1: 1 page, typed outline

  • Your research question will be your title
  • An introduction with a clear thesis statement that covers the 3 themes that you are going to focus on
  • 3 body paragraphs with topic sentences, main argument, supporting arguments, facts and stats
  • A conclusion where you synthesize your answer
  • Your bibliography should have at least four valid sources including one interview, using MLA Works Cited  citation
  • At least 2 of the source should have a short OPPVL (1 or 2 sentences per point)

Show initiative and explore as many different avenues as possible in looking for information.  You are trying to give an honest portrayal of this group of people to a larger audience. Think about what you want them to know about this group when they finish reading your piece. This message should be evident in your outline. 

Part 2: In-class essay

  • You will only be allowed to bring your outline, water and writing material
  • You will have 60 minutes to write a 5 paragraph essay
  • With proper in-text citations
  • Your narrative should be between 500-600 words.  

 

Creating a good research question:

Research Rundowns

InS 8: Development Project

Statement of Inquiry:

In understanding why inequality exists between and within nations we must understand its history, geography and how power and resources come to be shared

Concepts: Causality, Equity, Resources

 

You will act as a representative for a country in the United Nations.

  • You will investigate the HISTORY and GEOGRAPHY of one of the following countries
    • HIC: USA, UK, Japan, Germany, Singapore, South Korea
    • LIC: Mauritania, Honduras, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Bolivia, 
    • MIC: Latvia, Nigeria, China, Argentina, Kazakhstan, Qatar, Venezuela, Cuba , Morocco
  • You will communicate knowledge and understanding of how the history,  geography and/or resources have affected the development of the country

Part 1: Factsheet

Create a factsheet  that shows your knowledge and understanding of the history, geography and development of your country

It can be on one side of an A4 (G.doc) page or 6 slides of a slideshow.

Include, define and explain information such as:

  • Images that represent your country’s development and resources
  • Development indicators and statistics
  • Maps, graphs and diagrams
  • Major historical events that affects your country’s development

You must also include:

  • The top three factors that affected the development of your country, with a short explanation for each one
  • One paragraph synthesizing the information on your factsheet explaining how history and/or geography has affected your country’s development, listing the top three factors
  • A varied perspective. (The good and the bad!)
  • MLA citations

Part 2: Speech

On Friday November 30th, you will present a short, 90 second speech answering the following question, using statistics, historical events and/or geography to support your argument. 

“Explain the main cause(s) and consequence of one important developmental issue your country faces today”

  • The issue can be one or a combination of social, economic, political, environmental, demographic

Hyperlink your work here

Part 1 and 2 TSC

Due date: November 30th

Useful sources:

For Citations:

InS 10: Kamakura Beach study, Part 2

Now that we have collected all of our data, it is time to put it all together.

First, make sure all of your paper data is inputed here

PART 2 – graphing results, analysis, conclusion and evaluation

Please use clear headings for these sections.

-1. Graph your data in order to analyse your findings

* Note – Graphs can be computer generated or done by hand and must have titles, referred to and be integrated into the text, where you talk about them. You should use a variety of suitable graphs to display data. They must be clear, have labelled/numbered axis and titled. Be as creative as you want when illustrating all of your work.

Here are some graphing ideas

Right Angle Triangle calculator

Drawing a cross section by hand

-2. Write the trend of each graph underneath, including anomalies

-3.  Write your analysis under the headings of each Hypotheses.

You will state what we expected with reference to our studies on coastal processes and landforms.( use what we have learned in class! ) You will analyse ( describe and explain ) the data you collected with regard to the expectations of a destructive beach, and state whether or not you have proved or disproved each hypothesis. DO NOT ANSWER THE RESEARCH QUESTION. You will do this in the conclusion. 

Use pictures throughout your analysis to support your arguments. 

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  1. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  • Create 1 graph  to illustrate your findings roundness and size and analyse what you found. (use class averages )
  1. The waves will be high ( 1 metre or more ) and frequent ( more than 12 per minute )
  • Using a table to illustrate the data and graph the 2 class averages..
  1. There will be a strong longshore drift
  • Analyse your findings referring to prevailing wind, direction of movement  and time taken for any movement of material over 10m. If it is over 3m per minute then it is considered strong.

5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defenses) that the beach is being destroyed

  • Using your field sketch, pictures and the observational notes you made as well as photographs present any evidence of the above. Use lots of photos and be creative here. Annotate your photographs to show what they illustrate.

4. CONCLUSION

Sum up what you found. Are your hypotheses mainly proven or disproven?  Use each hypothesis to base the summary of your findings in order to give your answer to the question: “ Is the beach at Kamakura Inmuragasaki a destructive beach?”

5. EVALUATION

  1. Briefly evaluate your methods (discuss positive and negatives) (not the execution of your peers!)
  2. Suggest how the study/methodology might be improved
  3. Suggest how the study might be extended.

TSC – A, B, C & D

Due date: Tuesday December 4th

Hyperlink your work here

InS 8: Sustainable Development Goals

In 2015, the UN launched the Sustainable Development Goals: find out what they are and why they were devised here.

You will each make a bid to the class to persuade them of the importance of your allocated goal. You should explain why you believe your goal is the most important of the new sustainable development goal and therefore deserves the most funding. You have 2 minutes to explain what your goal means, and why it is so important.

But first, let’s talk about Communication ATLs.

  • What do you dislike about presenting in front of people?
  • What factors make a poor presentation?
  • What makes a good presentation?
  •  What tips do you have to help people with public speaking?

Each one of you will have one specific goal to focus on as they present in front of the class.

Hyperlink your goal here

Exercise 2

Now that we have an understanding of the SDGs

  • Are some more important in certain countries?
  • Are they realistic goals?
  • What issues might arise when trying to reach these goals?
  • How are they interconnected?

 

In groups of 3, you will create a flow chart using the hexagon handout, explaining the interconnectedness of the SDGs. 

  • You will use the extra hexagons to explain, in one sentence,  the link between each hexagon,
  • Use extra paper to do make more hexagons.
  • You may create clusters if you cannot find links
  • Include an explanation of any issues or “dead-end” you encounter, if you cannot make a link or if you find a flaw in the SDG.

Exercise 3

In your same groups, find a real world example of the following and explain it to the class:

  1. An SDG Initiative in a LIC that is currently successful
  2. An SDG Initiative in a LIC that is currently unsuccessful
  3. An HIC’s plan to tackle SDGs inside its country – explain and evaluate the plan
  4. An HIC’s plan to tackle SDGs outside its country – explain and evaluate the plan
  5. An example of a correlation you have discussed in exercise 2
  6. An example of a correlation you have discussed in exercise 2
  7. An example of a correlation you have discussed in exercise 2

Create one slide here to present your answer

InS 9: Introduction to Social History

Columbus and the Native Americans.

In table groups, discuss the following questions:

  • What do you know about Christopher Columbus? What is your opinion of him?
  • What do you know about Native Americans, also called Indians
  • How did you learn about those things?
  • How do we know that the History we have learned is true?
  • Do Historians have an opinion about the topics they cover? Can they be biased?

Part 1:

Reading 1: Kennedy et al:

As you read, consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of this text? Why was it written?
  • What is the author’s perspective in the text? What is the main message?
  • Highlight words or passage who seem to demonstrate a bias, or that could lead the reader to gain a certain opinion on the subject.

Now that we’ve read about the Indians and Columbus.

Use a quote to support all answers

  • What is your opinion about them (the Indians and Columbus)  based on your reading?
  • What themes did the readings focus on?
  • If there is a bias, where does it come from and how is it manifested?
  • What kind of information was not included in the text? Why do you think they historians chose to omit it?

Further discussion:

  • How is our perception of History shaped by historians?
  • Are certain types of sources less biased?
  • Is there value in biased historical texts?

Reading 2: Howard Zinn (You will do this on your own while I am away)

  1. Make a copy of this document and put your name in the title
  2. Share the document with me AND hyperlink it here
  3. You have both periods to read the handout and answer all questions
  4. Due at the end of class

Part 2: Videos

Columbus on trial

What is the role of a historian?

  • If you were to retell a historical event, what would be the important questions you would want to answer?
  • How would you try to report accurate information?
  • What methods could you use do do this?

Here are a few methods used by historians:

  • Develop then test hypotheses (verify/falsify) (scientific method?)
  • Reconstruct the physical events
  • Develop a chronology
  • Reconstruct the ‘links’ between events and between the artefacts
  • Look for specific evidence to find the answer to a specific question
  • Test the consistency between the facts
  • Determine what is the relevant evidence
  • ‘Rethink’ the character’s actions
  • Determine what is ‘plausible’

Historians must consider ideas such as:

  • the degree to which the evidence is explained,
  • the quality of the connections between various facts,
  • the degree to which wild and unjustified claims are limited,
  • engagement with alternative interpretations and replies to those interpretations,
  • simplicity of explanation
  • Engagement of the narrative

This all connects to the methodology of History → how historians do History!

Part 3: Groupwork

In groups of 2, you will write a one paragraph description of Columbus’ “discovery” of the Americas and Native Americans, with a clear bias for or against him.

  • Use words that will emphasize your opinion
  • Include/omit the information that will best serve your purpose
  • Do not make up facts!
  • You will present your paragraph to the class.

Discussion: 

  • How can you read history and be aware of biases?
  • If you were to write about Columbus, what themes would you focus on, knowing that you cannot write everything about everything?
  • What themes would you not include?

Useful sources

Practice OPVL #1  with ATL component

InS8: Introduction to Development

In understanding why inequality exists between and within nations we must understand its history, geography and how power and resources come to be shared.

  • What do you understand about this statement of inquiry?
  • What do you already know about it?
  • What questions do you have about it?

Discussion Questions:

  • What is development?
  • Why is the world unequal?
  • Why are there poor countries and rich countries?
  • Is wealth the only way to measure development?
  • What is quality of life? How do you measure it?

Exercise 1:

Look at the Longman Student Atlas, p. 14 to 23

    • In groups of 4, look at the different choropleth maps and discuss the reason for the differences between countries
    • Find some trends of countries that seem to be “better off” or “worse off”?
    • Find exceptions to your trends?
    • Discuss how these maps can be misleading and/or biased?

What is HDI

Exercise 2:

Have a look at

In groups, come up with your own human development index. Pick between 2 and 4 indicators you believe will show how developed a country is, in comparaison to another.

You will then tabulate the data and create your own choropleth map, including:

  • A title
  • A key
  • At least 10 countries colored in
  • A brief explanation of the trend found in your map

Task 2:

-Choose 2 countries on Gapminder to research.

-Picking countries with varying levels of development will be easier to compare and contrast, but you are free to pick any 2 countries.

-Look up the following indicators for both countries:

  • Population growth
  • Infant Mortality Rate
  • GDP per capita
  • Human Development Index (HDI)
  • Fertility rate
  • Life expectancy
  • Literacy Rate

Blogpost

Write a blog post explaining the main differences you have noticed when looking at the indicators above. Can you explain why your two countries have such differences? Are the indicators interrelated? Explain your answer.

Hyperlink your post on this doc: 8B

If you are done, find a partner and carefully read each-other’s blogposts. Then, comment on their blogs. Give an overall assessment of the reflection by agreeing, disagreeing and asking questions to further the discussion.

InS 10 Field Trip: Kamakura Beach Study

On September 3rd, we will be going to Kamakura to conduct a few data collection experiments on Inamuragasaki beach in Kamakura.

On the day, you will either meet us:

What to bring:

  • Wear your YIS PE t-shirt
  • Your lunch (You will not be allowed to go to the store from the beach)
  • Water
  • Sunscreen and sunglasses
  • A camera or smartphone
  • Swimsuit and towel for those going in the water.

————————————————————-

The field trip has two main aims

  1. To familiarize you with the processes and landforms of the coastal environment and mitigation methods
  2. To conduct fieldwork required for a geographical investigation of a coastal zone

Our research question is:

“ Is Inamuragasaki beach a destructive beach?”

To help answer this we are gathering data on beach characteristics, beach material, gradient and waves, as well as making observations to decide whether or not it is destructive or constructive  

We will try to prove or disprove the following Hypotheses

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  2. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  3. The waves will be high ( 1 meter or more ) and frequent ( more than 13 per minute)
  4. There will be a strong longshore drift
  5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defenses) that the beach is being destroyed

Methodology

We will be working in class groups to make information sharing easier. There will be 8 transects. See map for transects and groups

Each class will be split into 4 groups and will rotate their tasks. See rotation and explanation. You will have a copy of this with you.

Since we will be going with Ms Wilson’s classes, here is our schedule for the day:

Time Task
Morning: 10:30 to 12:00 Tasks 2 and 3: Waves, Longshore Drift  and Observations
Afternoon: 12:30 – 2:00 Task 1 – Beach Material and Gradient

 

PART 1 – Introduction, location and method

Before we go, you need to have a good understanding of the area we are going to research, and of the methodology of our experiments

In groups of 3, you will need:

  • A title page – include your name
  • Contents page ( this will be done last)
  • Clear headings for each section – INTRODUCTION/LOCATION, METHOD etc
  • INTRODUCTION
    • A one paragraph description of the location (history, geographic location and site)
    • A hand drawn map of the beach, and another situating it in Japan
    • A brief introduction to the aims of the study
    • our research question
    • Your hypotheses with justification.
  • METHODOLOGY
    • You will explain, using visual aids (pictures or drawings) how to conducted each experiment
    • Including a brief justification ( why you think this method is appropriate )
    • Include a list of all the material needed, with pictures.
  • TSC – B & C
  • Due date: 

    • 10B: Nov 14
    • 10C: Nov 16

Data tabulation sheet

InS 10: Intro to Coastal Processes and Landforms, and Seminar week Homework

Here is your homework during Seminar week.

Read this handout and answer the following questions, by hand, with your name and clear labels:

  • Page  27 Activities, #1, 2, 3
    • Broken lines = dotted lines
  • Page 29 Activity, all 6 questions
  • Page 31 Activities, # 1, 2
  • Page 33 # 1 only

For class only, do not do the exercises below for seminar week homework homework

Our next unit will be about coastal processes and erosional landforms, leading to another field trip to Kamakura, but this time we will be collecting primary data about the Inamuragasaki Beach on November 2nd

  • What are waves?
  • Why do they come in different shapes and sizes?
  • What generates waves?
  • How do beaches form?
  • What different types of beaches are there?
  • Can you explain why they look different?
  • How do cliffs form?
  • What shapes mountains and coasts?

Part 1: Marine Processes presentation

Take detailed notes of the slide show

WAVES

Why are waves different?

The prefect wave?

ACTIVITY

In groups of 2 or 3, you will explain one of the following features:

  • Constructive wave
  • Destructive wave
  • Ocean swells
  • Rip currents
  • Billabong
  • Erosion
  • Corrasion
  • Hydraulic action
  • Corrosion
  • Longshore Drift

There’s a catch! Only one person in the group will be allowed to talk. The others will have to “act-out” your explanation without speaking.

Useful link,  or try using this reading,

We will present in 10 minutes at the end of class.

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