Category: Individuals and Societies 10 (page 1 of 11)

InS 10: Coastal Processes and Landforms Poster – First summative

You will have today’s class and a double period during seminar week to complete this task. You should submit it at the end of the priod next week. You may want to do some homework before then.

Due dates:

  • 10A: Wednesday Oct 18th, periods 3 and 4
  • 10C: Friday Oct 20th, periods 1 and 2

Using this reading,  (source) create a poster or booklet explaining, with the aid of diagrams, the formation of:

  • Cliffs
  • Wave Cut Platforms
  • Caves
  • Arches
  • Stacks
  • Stumps
  • Bays
  • Headlands.

Your resource should also include how erosion and/or deposition processes produced the landform. To do so, explain the 4 processes of erosion and produce fully annotated diagrams. The four processes are:

  • Attrition
  • Corrasion
  • Corrosion
  • Hydraulic action

Examples of each landform with at least one photograph and/or map of it’s location from anywhere in the world

  • Links to the sources of information of your images/maps/photographs should be cited
  • You may use your own photographs

 

TSC, Criterion A

InS 10: Intro to cosatals processes and landforms

Our next unit will be about coastal processes and erosional landforms, leading to another field trip to Kamakura, but this time we will be collecting primary data about the Inamuragasaki Beach on November 3rd

First, a few guiding questions to get us started.

WAVES

What are waves?

Why do they come in different shapes and sizes?

What generates waves?

Why are waves different?

The prefect wave?

BEACHES

What different types of beaches are there?

Can you explain why they look different?

ACTIVITY

In groups of 3 or 4, you will explain one of the following features:

  • Constructive wave
  • Destructive wave
  • Ocean swells
  • Rip currents
  • Billabong
  • Erosion
  • Corrasion
  • Hydraulic action
  • Corrosion
  • Longshore Drift

There’s a catch! Only one person in the group will be allowed to talk. The others will have to “act-out” your explanation without speaking.

Useful link,  or try using this reading,

We will present in 10 minutes the end of class.

Part 2: Marine Processes presentation

Take detailed notes of the slide show

 

InS 10: Edo museum visit, OPPVL presentation and Edo Analytical Essay

We have been discussing the Edo period for some time now and you are expected to have a topic in mind that you would like to research further.

We will be visiting the Edo Museum on  Tuesday. While you are expected to look at the entire display and gain a better understanding of that section of Japanese history, you will need to find one source that you will use in your research project on order to complete an OPPVL.Make sure to take pictures of the source you choose and collect as much details about its author/creator as possible.

Your first summative assessment will be to complete and OPPVL

Hyperlink all of your work here

_________________________________________

Once your OPPVL presentation is done, you may begin researching on your Analytical Edo Essay

Due Oct 6th, but see project detail for internal deadlines.

Hyperlink all of your work here

InS 10: Resting place of 10 of the 47 Ronins

This is coming from one of my InS 10 students. The pictures were taken on the grounds of the Italian Embassy in Tokyo:

“The writing in Italian says: “On February 4th 1703 in this garden, 10 of the 47 ronins killed themselves. The R. (“Royal” because at the time there was still a monarchy in Italy) Ambassador Giacinto Avriti placed this memorial A.D. 1939. XVIII E.F. (Fascist Era – on the 18th year of Mussolini’s rule).”
The writing in Japanese, on the other hand, reads the names of the 10 ronins and a brief summary of the story.
The garden of the Italian Embassy is one of the most ancient in Tokyo. The territory was once home to the Shogun, Matsudaira Ōkinokami, before it was bought by the Italian government.
The trees within the garden allows us to date it all the way back to the XVII century.
During the Edo period, an interesting happening took place in the garden of Matsudaira’s residence: 10 of the 47 ronins killed themselves in 1703. This event is remembered in Japanese culture through the popular play, “Chūshingura“.
The killings took place where the pond now lays in the garden, as the ground was removed to create a small artificial hill where, in 1939, a commemorative stele of the event was erected by the Italian government.
Matsudaira’s property later passed to Prince Masayoshi Matsukata, a known politic of the Meiji period, who was Prime Minister twice.
A little after the events that took place in 1701 to 1702, such as the attack to a high shogunal official, Kira Kozukenosuke’s palace on December 15 1702, many theatrical plays began to circulate Japan. The plays narrated the past happenings, as theater at the time was a way of communicating events, usually dramatic, to the population.”

InS 10: Introduction to Edo or Tokugawa Period – 1603-1868

As a preparation for your research essay on the Edo period, (will change) we will be discussing various issue related to the Edo era.

As we watch and discuss the various videos, think of possible research topics for your essay.

Example:

  • Role of the Samurai
  • Foreign influence
  • Matthew Perry
  • Bakufu military government
  • Art, fashion, ukiyo-e
  • Rule of law
  • “The Christian Problem”
  • Social Structure – Empror, Daimyos, shogunate, peasants,
  • Rituals and religion
  • The role of women
  • Entertainment
  • Geishas
  • Kabuki theater
  • Education
  • Battles to “pacify” the country

Akira Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, (The bodyguard) trailer and opening sequence:

  • How do these clips differ from the traditional view of the samurai?
  • Can you explain why the character is wandering aimlessly?
  • Do you know the story of the 47 Ronins? What does it say about the role of samurais in the Edo period?

Edo History

We will have discussions and guided questions after each videos. You will then have to write a short summary of each section for your notes, with a special section for possible themes you would like to research.

Share your notes here.

Guiding questions:
Clip 1:
  • What was the political situation in Japan before the Edo period?
  • What did foreigners want from contact with Japan?
Clip 2
  • What did you learn from the daily lives of Japanese people at the time?
  • Discuss the role of missionaries and the Daimyos who converted
  • Discuss the Samurai code of honor – What was their role in society?
Clip 3
  • Explain the concept of seppuku
  • Explain Oda Nobunaga’s role in raising Ieyasu and in Japanese politics at the time.

Clip 4:

  • Explain the downfall of Oda Nobunaga and the event that followed
  • Explain Hideyoshi’s rise to power and his ambitions
  • Explain how Ieyasu finally gained control over Edo
  • Can you explain the difference in strategies between Ieyasu and Hideyoshi?

Clip 5:

  • Explain the Dutch influence on Japanese Medecine and other sciences
  • Describe the foreigner’s interest with Japan, and the Japanese response to it.

Clip 6:

  • Explain Commodore Perry’s involvement in the opening up of Japan
  • How did Japanese people respond to the American influence?

Edo Social Structure

InS 10: What is History’s role in Society?

Part 1: History, what is it good for?

First we will read; A Point Of View: What is history’s role in society? and have a socratic debate about the definition and role of history in our lives. 

  • How do we research history?
  • How do we know what “really” happened in the past?
  • How can we evaluate the quality of our sources?
  • Is there value in “bad” sources?
  • How does history change over time?
  • How does history affect:
    • us
    • our community
    • our society
    • our global interactions?

Part 2: You will have to pick a topic for your upcoming project. Consider the many different perspectives in history and think of specific examples for each one:

  • Political history: the story of government, political leaders, electoral activities, the making of policy, and the interaction of branches of government
  • Diplomatic history: the study of the relations between nations, diplomats, and ideas of diplomacy
  • Social history: the study of ways and customs, of family, education, children, demography (population change), and voluntary institutions (churches, for example)
  • Cultural history: the study of language and its uses, of the arts and literature, sport, and entertainment, in constructing cultural categories
  • Economic history: the study of how an entire system of production and consumption (or of any of its parts) works, of markets, industry, credit, and working people at all levels of the system
  • Intellectual history: the study of ideology and epistemology, analyzing how ideas affect human actions and how the material world affects human ideas
  • People’s history:  history from below, or folk history is a type of historical narrative which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people rather than political and other leaders.
  • Can you think of others?

Part 3: How do we analyse sources? 

  • Quick review from grade 9 InS: What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source?
  • Introduction using these sources with an extra P for Perspective!  See powerpoint

Exercise: Find a political cartoon from any time in history. Write an OPPVL for it. About 2-3 sentences per aspect. Print both for a gallery walk. 

 

Here is a more detailed description of an OPPVL

InS 10: Prep for guest speakers

Next Wednesday, we will have guest speakers coming to talk to us about the reasons they have left their own countries as refugees, because their human rights were threatened.

Here are a few videos to have some background information on the situations in their countries:

Chile

 

Tibet

Guatemala

Introduction to Human rights part 2

  • In groups, do a PMI graph or flow chart  on the UN description of Human rights
  • Too much light makes the baby go blind: The Human Rights version
    • In groups of 2 or 3, you will each be assigned 5 articles of the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights
    • You will plan short skits/performances for each one – BE CREATIVE
    • We will then present each skits in Too much light makes the baby go blind fashion

Further research

I will be absent all week

Hi guys,

I will be absent all week to attend the senior retreat in Niigata. Here is the work for the week.

  • Grade 9: Work on your social history assessment 
  • Grade 10:  Work on your Paris Editorial, making sure to do part 2 in groups first.  (Due on Monday)
  • You can all ask Ms Wilson if you have any questions about the project. 
  • Have a great week, be nice to your subs, and email me if there are any major issues.
  • Have fun!

InS 10: Intro to Human Rights

Should freedom of expression be limited in some cases?

We will read read the handout Graphic Organizer-Contrasting Views on Human Rights about  Skokie, Illinois, 1977

Consider:

  • What are the limits to Freedom of Speech?
  • What is considered hate speech?

Part 2:

Consider:

  • What is satire, and what is its purpose?
  • What is the role of media in the freedom of speech debate?
  • Is Freedom of Speech relative to specific cultures?
  • How has freedom of speech changed in the globalized world?

What is Charlie Hebdo?

Then, in groups of 7 or 8, each person read one of the sources about the  Paris, attacks of 2015 and debate the issues of freedom of speech brought up by a publication like Charlie Hebdo. Make sure that each person has a chance to express the perspective of their source.

Ideas to consider:

  • Is Charlie Hebdo Hate speech?
  • Did their cartoons go too far? Did they incite violence?
  • Should religion be protected against hate speech?
  • Should religious taboos be protected against hate speech?
  • What are the limits of free speech?

Part 3:

Write a short editorial in answer to one of the newspapers in the handout expressing your opinion on whether ‘Freedom of Expression’ should be limited based on what happened in Paris.

  • Post it on your blog and share the link with me here. 
  • 200 words or less
  • You do not need a bibliography but you may mention sources to strengthen your argument
  • Make sure you directly address a specific source
  • You do not need to explain the events, or have an introduction and conclusion. Dive right into it!
  • TSC Criteria D, Critical Thinking
  • Due Monday May 29th. You will have one more period to work on this if need be. 

Editorial: An editorial is one of the writing styles used to express an opinion or reaction to timely news, an event, or an issue of concern. Most editorials are used to influence readers to think or act the same way the writer does. Your argument should be strong and be backed up with accurate details that show that the opposing argument(s) contain weaknesses. You must take a side, do not waffle or be wishy-washy, stick to your argument or opinion, and be clear and forceful.  Most important is organization. An editorial has little room in which to deliver its message. The structure must be well worked out and follow a logical sequence. 

 

Older posts

© 2017 Geography Blog

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar