Category: Individuals and Societies 10 (page 1 of 12)

InS 10: Introduction to Market Failure

In groups, discuss:

  • What do you know about pricing?
  • How do companies calculate the cost of a good?
  • Why are similar goods sometimes priced differently?
  • Why are goods different prices in different places?

Once again:

  • What is supply and demand?
  • Give a concrete example

What is missing in the supply and demand equation?

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Market failure is when pricing mechanism leads to an inefficient allocation of (scarce) resources and loss of economic welfare

Today, we will only consider 2 types of market failure: positive and negative externalities

Externalities are the consequence of an industrial or commercial activity which affects other parties without this being reflected in market prices

  • What is not included in the price of:
    • Cigarettes?
    • Cars?
    • Tree planting?
    • Education?

How can we adjust prices, now that we know their externalities?

 

Externalities do not have to be about pricing. Any activity that has an unintended impact on a third party can be seen as an externality.

In your groups, think of at least three positive and three negative externalities in the school. 

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Exercise:

Each of you will read one of the following articles and explain:


If time:

How is Christmas an externality?

Or spot all the externalities in Dr Seuss’ the Lorax

InS 10 – Kamakura Beach Study Write-Up

Now that we have collected all of our data, it is time to put it all together.

First, make sure all of your paper data is inputed here

PART 2 – graphing results, analysis, conclusion and evaluation

Please use clear headings for these sections.

ANALYSIS

First you will graph your data in order to analyse your findings

* Note – Graphs can be computer generated or done by hand and must have titles, referred to and be integrated into the text, where you talk about them. You should use a variety of suitable graphs to display data. They must be clear, have labelled/numbered axis and titled. Be as creative as you want when illustrating all of your work.

Write your analysis under the headings of each Hypotheses. You will state what we expected with reference to our studies on coastal processes and landforms.( use what we have learned in class! ) You will analyse ( describe and explain ) the data you collected with regard to the expectations of a destructive beach, and state whether or not you have proved or disproved each hypothesis. DO NOT ANSWER THE RESEARCH QUESTION. You will do this in the conclusion. 

Graphing suggestions:

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  • Create a beach profile by graphing the angle of slope from each quadrat of your transect and analyse this bearing in mind what we know about a destructive profile (use class averages)
  • 3D graphing on Excel
  1. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  1. The waves will be high ( 1 metre or more ) and frequent ( more than 12 per minute )
  • Use a table or pictograph to illustrate the data and graph the 2 class averages.
  1. There will be a strong longshore drift
  • Analyse your findings referring to prevailing wind, direction of movement  and time taken for any movement of material over 10m. If it is over 3m per minute then it is considered strong.

         5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and evidence of Mitigation (man-made defences) which illustrate that show            the beach is being destroyed.

  • Using a field sketch and the observational notes you made as well as photographs present any evidence of the above. Use lots of photos and be creative here. Annotate your photographs to show what they illustrate.

CONCLUSION

Sum up what you found. Are your hypotheses mainly proven or disproven?  Go through each hypothesis and state whether it’s proved or disproved, based on the summary of your findings you will conclude and give your answer to the question: “ Is the beach at Kamakura Inmuragasaki a destructive beach?”

EVALUATION

Briefly evaluate (discuss positive and negatives)

  1. the methods and how these might have been improved (not the execution of your peers!)
  2. suggest how the study/methodology might be improved 
  3. how the study might be extended.

TSC for this  A, B, C & D

Hyperlink your work here

Due date: 

10A: Wednesday December 6th

10C: Tuesday December 5th

InS 10: Field Trip Beach Study To Kamakura

On November 3rd, we will be going to Kamakura to conduct a few data collection experiments on Inamuragasaki beach in Kamakura.

On the day, you will either meet us:

What to bring:

  • Wear your YIS PE t-shirt
  • Your lunch
  • Water
  • Sunscreen and sunglasses
  • A camera or smartphone
  • Swimsuit and towel for those going in the water.

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The fieldtrip has two main aims

  1. To familiarise you with the processes and landforms of the coastal environment and mitigation methods
  2. To conduct fieldwork required for a geographical investigation of a coastal zone

Our research question is:

“ Is Inamuragasaki beach a destructive beach?”

To help answer this we are gathering data on beach characteristics, beach material, gradient and waves, as well as making observations to decide whether or not it is destructive or constructive  

We will try to prove or disprove the following Hypotheses

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  2. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  3. The waves will be high ( 1 metre or more ) and frequent ( more than 13 per minute)
  4. There will be a strong longshore drift
  5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defences) that the beach is being destroyed

Methodology

We will be working in class groups to make information sharing easier. There will be 8 transects. See map for transects and groups

Each class will be split into 4 groups and will rotate their tasks. See rotation and explanation. You will have a copy of this with you.

Since we will be going with Ms Wilson’s classes, here is our schedule for the day:

Time Task
Morning: 10:30 to 12:00 Tasks 2 and 3: Waves, Longshore Drift  and Observations
Afternoon: 12:30 – 2:00 Task 1 – Beach Material and Gradient

 

PART 1 – Introduction, location and method

Before we go, you need to have a good understanding of the area we are going to research, and of the methodology of our experiments

In groups of 3, you will need:

  • A title page – include your name
  • Contents page ( this will be done last)
  • Clear headings for each section – INTRODUCTION/LOCATION, METHOD etc
  • INTRODUCTION
    • A one or two paragraph description of the location (history, geographic location and site)
    • A hand drawn map of the beach, and another situating it in Japan
    • The aims of the study
    • Our research question
    • Your five hypotheses with justification.
  • METHODOLOGY
    • You will explain, using visual aids (pictures or drawings) how to conducted each experiment
    •  Including a brief justification ( why you think this method is appropriate )
    • Include a list of all the material needed, with pictures.

TSC – B & C 

Due date:

  • 10A: November 14
  • 10C: November 15

InS 10: Coastal Processes and Landforms Poster – First summative

You will have today’s class and a double period during seminar week to complete this task. You should submit it at the end of the priod next week. You may want to do some homework before then.

Due dates:

  • 10A: Wednesday Oct 18th, periods 3 and 4
  • 10C: Friday Oct 20th, periods 1 and 2

Using this reading,  (source) create a poster or booklet explaining, with the aid of diagrams, the formation of:

  • Cliffs
  • Wave Cut Platforms
  • Caves
  • Arches
  • Stacks
  • Stumps
  • Bays
  • Headlands.

Your resource should also include how erosion and/or deposition processes produced the landform. To do so, explain the 4 processes of erosion and produce fully annotated diagrams. The four processes are:

  • Attrition
  • Corrasion
  • Corrosion
  • Hydraulic action

Examples of each landform with at least one photograph and/or map of it’s location from anywhere in the world

  • Links to the sources of information of your images/maps/photographs should be cited
  • You may use your own photographs

 

TSC, Criterion A

InS 10: Intro to cosatals processes and landforms

Our next unit will be about coastal processes and erosional landforms, leading to another field trip to Kamakura, but this time we will be collecting primary data about the Inamuragasaki Beach on November 3rd

First, a few guiding questions to get us started.

WAVES

What are waves?

Why do they come in different shapes and sizes?

What generates waves?

Why are waves different?

The prefect wave?

BEACHES

What different types of beaches are there?

Can you explain why they look different?

ACTIVITY

In groups of 3 or 4, you will explain one of the following features:

  • Constructive wave
  • Destructive wave
  • Ocean swells
  • Rip currents
  • Billabong
  • Erosion
  • Corrasion
  • Hydraulic action
  • Corrosion
  • Longshore Drift

There’s a catch! Only one person in the group will be allowed to talk. The others will have to “act-out” your explanation without speaking.

Useful link,  or try using this reading,

We will present in 10 minutes the end of class.

Part 2: Marine Processes presentation

Take detailed notes of the slide show

 

InS 10: Edo museum visit, OPPVL presentation and Edo Analytical Essay

We have been discussing the Edo period for some time now and you are expected to have a topic in mind that you would like to research further.

We will be visiting the Edo Museum on  Tuesday. While you are expected to look at the entire display and gain a better understanding of that section of Japanese history, you will need to find one source that you will use in your research project on order to complete an OPPVL.Make sure to take pictures of the source you choose and collect as much details about its author/creator as possible.

Your first summative assessment will be to complete and OPPVL

Hyperlink all of your work here

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Once your OPPVL presentation is done, you may begin researching on your Analytical Edo Essay

Due Oct 6th, but see project detail for internal deadlines.

Hyperlink all of your work here

InS 10: Resting place of 10 of the 47 Ronins

This is coming from one of my InS 10 students. The pictures were taken on the grounds of the Italian Embassy in Tokyo:

“The writing in Italian says: “On February 4th 1703 in this garden, 10 of the 47 ronins killed themselves. The R. (“Royal” because at the time there was still a monarchy in Italy) Ambassador Giacinto Avriti placed this memorial A.D. 1939. XVIII E.F. (Fascist Era – on the 18th year of Mussolini’s rule).”
The writing in Japanese, on the other hand, reads the names of the 10 ronins and a brief summary of the story.
The garden of the Italian Embassy is one of the most ancient in Tokyo. The territory was once home to the Shogun, Matsudaira Ōkinokami, before it was bought by the Italian government.
The trees within the garden allows us to date it all the way back to the XVII century.
During the Edo period, an interesting happening took place in the garden of Matsudaira’s residence: 10 of the 47 ronins killed themselves in 1703. This event is remembered in Japanese culture through the popular play, “Chūshingura“.
The killings took place where the pond now lays in the garden, as the ground was removed to create a small artificial hill where, in 1939, a commemorative stele of the event was erected by the Italian government.
Matsudaira’s property later passed to Prince Masayoshi Matsukata, a known politic of the Meiji period, who was Prime Minister twice.
A little after the events that took place in 1701 to 1702, such as the attack to a high shogunal official, Kira Kozukenosuke’s palace on December 15 1702, many theatrical plays began to circulate Japan. The plays narrated the past happenings, as theater at the time was a way of communicating events, usually dramatic, to the population.”

InS 10: Introduction to Edo or Tokugawa Period – 1603-1868

As a preparation for your research essay on the Edo period, (will change) we will be discussing various issue related to the Edo era.

As we watch and discuss the various videos, think of possible research topics for your essay.

Example:

  • Role of the Samurai
  • Foreign influence
  • Matthew Perry
  • Bakufu military government
  • Art, fashion, ukiyo-e
  • Rule of law
  • “The Christian Problem”
  • Social Structure – Empror, Daimyos, shogunate, peasants,
  • Rituals and religion
  • The role of women
  • Entertainment
  • Geishas
  • Kabuki theater
  • Education
  • Battles to “pacify” the country

Akira Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, (The bodyguard) trailer and opening sequence:

  • How do these clips differ from the traditional view of the samurai?
  • Can you explain why the character is wandering aimlessly?
  • Do you know the story of the 47 Ronins? What does it say about the role of samurais in the Edo period?

Edo History

We will have discussions and guided questions after each videos. You will then have to write a short summary of each section for your notes, with a special section for possible themes you would like to research.

Share your notes here.

Guiding questions:
Clip 1:
  • What was the political situation in Japan before the Edo period?
  • What did foreigners want from contact with Japan?
Clip 2
  • What did you learn from the daily lives of Japanese people at the time?
  • Discuss the role of missionaries and the Daimyos who converted
  • Discuss the Samurai code of honor – What was their role in society?
Clip 3
  • Explain the concept of seppuku
  • Explain Oda Nobunaga’s role in raising Ieyasu and in Japanese politics at the time.

Clip 4:

  • Explain the downfall of Oda Nobunaga and the event that followed
  • Explain Hideyoshi’s rise to power and his ambitions
  • Explain how Ieyasu finally gained control over Edo
  • Can you explain the difference in strategies between Ieyasu and Hideyoshi?

Clip 5:

  • Explain the Dutch influence on Japanese Medecine and other sciences
  • Describe the foreigner’s interest with Japan, and the Japanese response to it.

Clip 6:

  • Explain Commodore Perry’s involvement in the opening up of Japan
  • How did Japanese people respond to the American influence?

Edo Social Structure

InS 10: What is History’s role in Society?

Part 1: History, what is it good for?

First we will read; A Point Of View: What is history’s role in society? and have a socratic debate about the definition and role of history in our lives. 

  • How do we research history?
  • How do we know what “really” happened in the past?
  • How can we evaluate the quality of our sources?
  • Is there value in “bad” sources?
  • How does history change over time?
  • How does history affect:
    • us
    • our community
    • our society
    • our global interactions?

Part 2: You will have to pick a topic for your upcoming project. Consider the many different perspectives in history and think of specific examples for each one:

  • Political history: the story of government, political leaders, electoral activities, the making of policy, and the interaction of branches of government
  • Diplomatic history: the study of the relations between nations, diplomats, and ideas of diplomacy
  • Social history: the study of ways and customs, of family, education, children, demography (population change), and voluntary institutions (churches, for example)
  • Cultural history: the study of language and its uses, of the arts and literature, sport, and entertainment, in constructing cultural categories
  • Economic history: the study of how an entire system of production and consumption (or of any of its parts) works, of markets, industry, credit, and working people at all levels of the system
  • Intellectual history: the study of ideology and epistemology, analyzing how ideas affect human actions and how the material world affects human ideas
  • People’s history:  history from below, or folk history is a type of historical narrative which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people rather than political and other leaders.
  • Can you think of others?

Part 3: How do we analyse sources? 

  • Quick review from grade 9 InS: What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source?
  • Introduction using these sources with an extra P for Perspective!  See powerpoint

Exercise: Find a political cartoon from any time in history. Write an OPPVL for it. About 2-3 sentences per aspect. Print both for a gallery walk. 

 

Here is a more detailed description of an OPPVL

InS 10: Prep for guest speakers

Next Wednesday, we will have guest speakers coming to talk to us about the reasons they have left their own countries as refugees, because their human rights were threatened.

Here are a few videos to have some background information on the situations in their countries:

Chile

 

Tibet

Guatemala

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