Category: Individuals and Societies 10 (page 1 of 14)

InS 10: Edo assessments

We have been discussing the Edo period for some time now and you are expected to have a topic in mind that you would like to research further.

We will be visiting the Edo Museum on  Tuesday. While you are expected to look at the entire display and gain a better understanding of that section of Japanese history, you will need to find one source that you will use in your research project on order to complete an OPPVL.Make sure to take pictures of the source you choose and collect as much details about its author/creator as possible.

Your first summative assessment will be to complete and OPPVL

Hyperlink all of your work here

_________________________________________

Once your OPPVL presentation is done, you may begin researching on your Analytical Edo Essay

Due Oct 6th, but see project detail for internal deadlines.

Hyperlink all of your work here

InS 10: Edo topic brainstorm

Discuss with a partner:

Have a short discussion with a partner of the topics you could be interested to research.

Take notes on a piece of paper. You can create a mind map or a visible thinking routine (see think wonder, see puzzle explore, I used to think…now I think etc)

Ask each other questions to make the topic more specific:

  • What do you know about this topic?
  • What kind of sources could you get?
  • What would be difficulties in finding information?
  • How can you make the topic more specific? Is it too broad for a 5 paragraph essay?
  • What kind of answers would you get?
  • Is it debatable?
  • etc.

Then, pick two or three topics you have discussed and fill out this google dos

Hyperlink your doc here

 

 

InS10: What is History’s role in Society? + Intro to Edo

Part 1: History, what is it good for?

First we will read; A Point Of View: What is history’s role in society? and have a socratic debate about the definition and role of history in our lives.

  • How do we research history?
  • How do we know what “really” happened in the past?
  • How can we evaluate the quality of our sources?
  • Is there value in “bad” sources?
  • How does history change over time?
  • How does history affect:
    • us
    • our community
    • our society
    • our global interactions?

Part 2: You will have to pick a topic for your upcoming project. Consider the many different perspectives in history and think of specific examples for each one:

  • Political history: the story of government, political leaders, electoral activities, the making of policy, and the interaction of branches of government
  • Diplomatic history: the study of the relations between nations, diplomats, and ideas of diplomacy
  • Social history: the study of ways and customs, of family, education, children, demography (population change), and voluntary institutions (churches, for example)
  • Cultural history: the study of language and its uses, of the arts and literature, sport, and entertainment, in constructing cultural categories
  • Economic history: the study of how an entire system of production and consumption (or of any of its parts) works, of markets, industry, credit, and working people at all levels of the system
  • Intellectual history: the study of ideology and epistemology, analyzing how ideas affect human actions and how the material world affects human ideas
  • People’s history:  history from below, or folk history is a type of historical narrative which attempts to account for historical events from the perspective of common people rather than political and other leaders.
  • Can you think of others?

Part 3: How do we analyze sources? 

  • Quick review from grade 9 InS: What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source?
  • Introduction using these sources with an extra P for Perspective!  See powerpoint

Exercise: Groups of 2

Using the virtual tour of Edo, Find a ukiyo-e from the Edo period of Japan.

Write an OPPVL for it.

About 2-3 sentences per aspect, but have as many examples as possible of the different types of information and history you can see by looking at the wood block print. 

10C slideshow

Here is a more detailed description of an OPPVL

 

Part 4: Intro to Edo:

As we watch and discuss the various videos, think of possible research topics for your essay.

Example:

  • Role of the Samurai
  • Foreign influence
  • Matthew Perry
  • Bakufu military government
  • Art, fashion, ukiyo-e
  • Rule of law
  • “The Christian Problem”
  • Social Structure – Empror, Daimyos, shogunate, peasants,
  • Rituals and religion
  • The role of women
  • Entertainment
  • Geishas
  • Kabuki theater
  • Education
  • Battles to “pacify” the country

Akira Kurosawa’s Yojimbo, (The bodyguard) trailer and opening sequence:

  • How do these clips differ from the traditional view of the samurai?
  • Can you explain why the character is wandering aimlessly?
  • Do you know the story of the 47 Ronins? What does it say about the role of samurais in the Edo period?

Part 5: Edo History (Work for Friday April 5th)

I will be absent today. You have the period to watch the following 6 videos. (Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5  & Part 6)

(See full doc here)

As you watch:

  • write a short summary of each section for your notes
  • Have a section for possible themes you would like to research.
  • Answer the guiding questions below
  • Share your notes here.

 

Guiding questions:
Part 1:
  • What was the political situation in Japan before the Edo period?
  • What did foreigners want from contact with Japan?
Part 2
  • What did you learn from the daily lives of Japanese people at the time?
  • Discuss the role of missionaries and the Daimyos who converted
  • Discuss the Samurai code of honor – What was their role in society?
Part 3
  • Explain the concept of seppuku
  • Explain Oda Nobunaga’s role in raising Ieyasu and in Japanese politics at the time.

Part 4:

  • Explain the downfall of Oda Nobunaga and the event that followed
  • Explain Hideyoshi’s rise to power and his ambitions
  • Explain how Ieyasu finally gained control over Edo
  • Can you explain the difference in strategies between Ieyasu and Hideyoshi?

Part 5:

  • Explain the Dutch influence on Japanese Medecine and other sciences
  • Describe the foreigner’s interest with Japan, and the Japanese response to it.

Part 6:

  • Explain Commodore Perry’s involvement in the opening up of Japan
  • How did Japanese people respond to the American influence?

Edo Social Structure

InS 10: Disorder research question in Stigma and treatment

Now that you have a good understanding of a disorder, its prevalence and its symptoms, it is time to look at stigma and treatment.

Researching Psychology. A message from Ms Vance:

“YIS has JSTOR, which you can browse by subject, as well as basic and advanced searches of course. Here’s a link to the Psychology section of JSTOR, which you can search within exclusively.  You’ve got access at school by IP address, but to use it at home, you have to create a personal account while you’re at school first.
 
EbscoHost – Science Reference Center database also has psychology resources, although they are likely easier to access if you look at the subject terms SRC uses before you start searching. Working with databases, as you know, can be frustrating when encountering them for more or less the first time. I would be DELIGHTED to come into your classes and train kids how to use them. 🙂
 
Same goes for History, economics and geography. They’ve been exposed to these databases as part of their PP but subject specific training on how to use them on a DP level would be very helpful for them.

Summative assessment: In groups, you will create a short video on a disorder, answering a research question that you will create about either stigma, treatment or both

Your research question question must be:

  • informative to your audience
  • about a stigma or the possible treatment of your disorder, or both
  • focused about a subject that can be answered in the timeframe
  • relevant to your disorder
  • relevant to Japan (try to have at least one Japanese speaker per group)

Find more resources on my diigo account #research question

Possible ideas explaining:

  • causes
  • stigma (in Japan)
  • multiple treatment options
  • how you can help in Japan
  • where people can go for help

Your video must clearly put the question in context and go on to answer it fully through:

  • Named case studies and academic research
  • Developing an understanding of the various issues facing the disorder
  • Where relevant, information about Japanese organizations helping people with the disorder
  • 2.5 to 3.5 minutes long

TSC (B + C)

Write your research question and hyperlink your video here

Due Friday March 8th. (Including WJAA players)

 

Past (Not necessarily perfect) examples.

See also: Anorexia in Japan

 

Working with Video handouts  and examples

 

InS10: Stigma towards Mental Disorders

Now that you have a good understanding of a disorder, its prevalence and its symptoms, it is time to look at stigma and treatment.

  • What has surprised you in your research or in the posters you have looked at
  • What are some misconceptions that people have about mental disorders?
  • Can mental disorders be treated? How?
  • What are some misconceptions that people have about treating mental disorders?

Source: New York Times, 2017/2/14

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • For what purpose did the “amateur diagnosticians” label Mr Trump a narcissist?
  • What is the purpose of the  letter to the editor?
  • What does it say about people’s perception of mental illness?
  • What does it say about stigma?

Stigma: a mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person.

  • What stigmas are you aware of?
  • How are they formed?
  • What are the consequences on people with mental illnesses?
  • What are the consequences on society?

  • How can we change society’s perception of mental illness?

Exercise:

For the disorder that you researched in your last assessment, find sources that clearly discuss stigma towards people with the disorder.

  • It can be a specific research or report. First hand accounts can be used as support, but not as primary evidence.
  • Describe how the stigma manifests itself in society
  • Describe the impact on the patient
  • Explain the source of the stigma (culture, history, misconception, media etc)
  • Evaluate one initiative that was done to reduce or eliminate the stigma

You will present your findings to the class

Quick review:

We will read Michael Friedman’s The Stigma of Mental Illness is Making us Sicker

If time:

 

 

InS 10: Summative Assessment: Disorder poster

We have been discussing ways of defining abnormality, and symptoms of various disorders. We will now look  prevalence and how it varies between regions, cultures, age groups  and genders.

You will create 1-sheet comparative report or poster or pictogram on the prevalence of 1 disorder.

Max 400 words

  • Describe the symptoms
  • Explain the current difference in prevalence between two countries or region in terms of :
    • Age
    • Socio economic level
    • Gender
    • Culture
    • Other relevant variable

LIST OF DISORDERS

  • Schizophrenia
  • Addiction (alcohol/substance)
  • Bulimia
  • ADHD
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder (a.k.a multiple personality disorder)
  • OCD
  • Other, with teacher approval

TSC A

Hyperlink your topic choices here

Due date:

  • 10B: Thursday January 31st
  • 10C: Tuesday January 29th

InS 10: Intro to Abnormality

Discuss:

  • What are phobias?
  • What causes phobias?
  • How are they treated?
  • Are they more nature or nurture?
  • What is the difference between fear and phobia?
  • What would you consider abnormal human behavior?
  • How can we measure such behavior?

Exercise 1:

  • Read the handout p. 161
  • In groups, explain the following ways of measuring abnormality and their evaluation, using specific examples:
    • Statistical infrequency
    • Deviation from social norms
    • Failure to function adequately
    • Deviation from ideal mental health

Let’s Kahoot it up!

Exercise 2: Models of abnormality


Model: A set of assumptions or concepts that help psychologists and/or scientists explain and interpret observations

  • Spells out basic assumptions and sets guidelines for investigation and treatment
  • Some may conflict with each other or be better suited for certain conditions

Exercise 2:

In groups, use the handout to explain the following models of abnormality, as well as their ethical and practical implications.

Do some research of an actual case study where your model has been used, and explain it to the class, using the model to structure your explanation.

  • Medical model
  • Psychoanalytic approach
  • Behavioral approach
  • Cognitive Approach
  • Humanistic approach

Exercise 3: Bias in Psychological studies

We will look at the Li-Repac Study (1980)

Read the handout and complete the questions

Rosenhan Study (1973)

  1. What are the ethical concerns of the Rosenhan study?
  2. In what ways did this study illustrate the problem of reliability and validity of diagnosis at the time?

 

Friday (or Tuesday) afternoon movies: Crash Course Psychology

InS 10: Kamakura Beach study, Part 2

Now that we have collected all of our data, it is time to put it all together.

First, make sure all of your paper data is inputed here

PART 2 – graphing results, analysis, conclusion and evaluation

Please use clear headings for these sections.

-1. Graph your data in order to analyse your findings

* Note – Graphs can be computer generated or done by hand and must have titles, referred to and be integrated into the text, where you talk about them. You should use a variety of suitable graphs to display data. They must be clear, have labelled/numbered axis and titled. Be as creative as you want when illustrating all of your work.

Here are some graphing ideas

Right Angle Triangle calculator

Drawing a cross section by hand

-2. Write the trend of each graph underneath, including anomalies

-3.  Write your analysis under the headings of each Hypotheses.

You will state what we expected with reference to our studies on coastal processes and landforms.( use what we have learned in class! ) You will analyse ( describe and explain ) the data you collected with regard to the expectations of a destructive beach, and state whether or not you have proved or disproved each hypothesis. DO NOT ANSWER THE RESEARCH QUESTION. You will do this in the conclusion. 

Use pictures throughout your analysis to support your arguments. 

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  1. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  • Create 1 graph  to illustrate your findings roundness and size and analyse what you found. (use class averages )
  1. The waves will be high ( 1 metre or more ) and frequent ( more than 12 per minute )
  • Using a table to illustrate the data and graph the 2 class averages..
  1. There will be a strong longshore drift
  • Analyse your findings referring to prevailing wind, direction of movement  and time taken for any movement of material over 10m. If it is over 3m per minute then it is considered strong.

5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defenses) that the beach is being destroyed

  • Using your field sketch, pictures and the observational notes you made as well as photographs present any evidence of the above. Use lots of photos and be creative here. Annotate your photographs to show what they illustrate.

4. CONCLUSION

Sum up what you found. Are your hypotheses mainly proven or disproven?  Use each hypothesis to base the summary of your findings in order to give your answer to the question: “ Is the beach at Kamakura Inmuragasaki a destructive beach?”

5. EVALUATION

  1. Briefly evaluate your methods (discuss positive and negatives) (not the execution of your peers!)
  2. Suggest how the study/methodology might be improved
  3. Suggest how the study might be extended.

TSC – A, B, C & D

Due date: Tuesday December 4th

Hyperlink your work here

InS 10 Field Trip: Kamakura Beach Study

On September 3rd, we will be going to Kamakura to conduct a few data collection experiments on Inamuragasaki beach in Kamakura.

On the day, you will either meet us:

What to bring:

  • Wear your YIS PE t-shirt
  • Your lunch (You will not be allowed to go to the store from the beach)
  • Water
  • Sunscreen and sunglasses
  • A camera or smartphone
  • Swimsuit and towel for those going in the water.

————————————————————-

The field trip has two main aims

  1. To familiarize you with the processes and landforms of the coastal environment and mitigation methods
  2. To conduct fieldwork required for a geographical investigation of a coastal zone

Our research question is:

“ Is Inamuragasaki beach a destructive beach?”

To help answer this we are gathering data on beach characteristics, beach material, gradient and waves, as well as making observations to decide whether or not it is destructive or constructive  

We will try to prove or disprove the following Hypotheses

  1. The beach gradient is steeper towards the back of the beach
  2. Beach material will be larger and more angular towards the back of the beach
  3. The waves will be high ( 1 meter or more ) and frequent ( more than 13 per minute)
  4. There will be a strong longshore drift
  5. There is natural evidence (erosional landforms) and man made evidence (defenses) that the beach is being destroyed

Methodology

We will be working in class groups to make information sharing easier. There will be 8 transects. See map for transects and groups

Each class will be split into 4 groups and will rotate their tasks. See rotation and explanation. You will have a copy of this with you.

Since we will be going with Ms Wilson’s classes, here is our schedule for the day:

Time Task
Morning: 10:30 to 12:00 Tasks 2 and 3: Waves, Longshore Drift  and Observations
Afternoon: 12:30 – 2:00 Task 1 – Beach Material and Gradient

 

PART 1 – Introduction, location and method

Before we go, you need to have a good understanding of the area we are going to research, and of the methodology of our experiments

In groups of 3, you will need:

  • A title page – include your name
  • Contents page ( this will be done last)
  • Clear headings for each section – INTRODUCTION/LOCATION, METHOD etc
  • INTRODUCTION
    • A one paragraph description of the location (history, geographic location and site)
    • A hand drawn map of the beach, and another situating it in Japan
    • A brief introduction to the aims of the study
    • our research question
    • Your hypotheses with justification.
  • METHODOLOGY
    • You will explain, using visual aids (pictures or drawings) how to conducted each experiment
    • Including a brief justification ( why you think this method is appropriate )
    • Include a list of all the material needed, with pictures.
  • TSC – B & C
  • Due date: 

    • 10B: Nov 14
    • 10C: Nov 16

Data tabulation sheet

InS 10: Intro to Coastal Processes and Landforms, and Seminar week Homework

Here is your homework during Seminar week.

Read this handout and answer the following questions, by hand, with your name and clear labels:

  • Page  27 Activities, #1, 2, 3
    • Broken lines = dotted lines
  • Page 29 Activity, all 6 questions
  • Page 31 Activities, # 1, 2
  • Page 33 # 1 only

For class only, do not do the exercises below for seminar week homework homework

Our next unit will be about coastal processes and erosional landforms, leading to another field trip to Kamakura, but this time we will be collecting primary data about the Inamuragasaki Beach on November 2nd

  • What are waves?
  • Why do they come in different shapes and sizes?
  • What generates waves?
  • How do beaches form?
  • What different types of beaches are there?
  • Can you explain why they look different?
  • How do cliffs form?
  • What shapes mountains and coasts?

Part 1: Marine Processes presentation

Take detailed notes of the slide show

WAVES

Why are waves different?

The prefect wave?

ACTIVITY

In groups of 2 or 3, you will explain one of the following features:

  • Constructive wave
  • Destructive wave
  • Ocean swells
  • Rip currents
  • Billabong
  • Erosion
  • Corrasion
  • Hydraulic action
  • Corrosion
  • Longshore Drift

There’s a catch! Only one person in the group will be allowed to talk. The others will have to “act-out” your explanation without speaking.

Useful link,  or try using this reading,

We will present in 10 minutes at the end of class.

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