Grade 4 graphic designers create campaign posters

The 4th graders have completed their campaign posters, from a collaborative unit which focused on the central idea that the media can influence thinking and behavior. The students worked in small groups to develop their own media campaign on a subject of their choosing. In art class, the students learned about Contrast, Unity, and Balance as principles of design, and they used these guidelines to help them create a visual display (e.g. a campaign poster) to communicate their goal for their campaign. The students made much progress in learning how to communicate visually using Contrast, Unity, and Balance to create a simple, clear message with text and images.

Have a look at the students at work:

Students did not rely on digital tools to help them to create their final posters. Instead the boys & girls made their posters in a more “traditional” manner: by hand, using pencils, rulers, paper, colored pencils, and/or markers. Both the students’ rough draft designs and their final version were shared with their peers globally on the website Creatubbles, where students both at YIS and in other schools worldwide could view and comments on their graphic design work. Our Grade 4 students used some of the constructive feedback to help them improve their visual communication. See the students’ work in the Grade 4 Art+Media Gallery (you’ll need to join Creatubbles first, but it’s easy and free to do so).

You may also view the results here — the campaign posters created by these young graphic designers:

Ultimately, the goals for the Grade 4 art students were for them to provide constructive criticism when responding to an artwork, to recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artwork, and to show an awareness of the affective power of the visual arts.

The 2015 YAMATE ART EXHIBITION

The annual Yamate Art Exhibition has begun!

The exhibition runs from Saturday February 14 to Monday February 23 at Bluff No. 115-3, The British House — link here — across the street from Y.I.S. (横浜市中区山手町115-3) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 23.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, each exhibited at a different residence on The Bluff.

There are 114 elementary school artists in this year’s show, so do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 students!

 

Grade 4 artists use organisms to spur their imaginations

In their homeroom classes, the Grade 4 students have been studying organisms and cultivating their garden. They have been focused on the central idea that “organisms rely on one another” while in art class we’ve been engaged in the visual art inquiry into how “the natural world is a rich source for imaginative artistic creation”.

Photo: A. Reed

Photo: A. Reed

Students began their two-part drawing project by, first, focusing on organisms (in this case, plants) and on the realistic depiction of them through close observation. We looked at how we focus first on the simple shapes and lines found in the plants’ leaves and stems; then, how we refine the shapes and lines into something more closely approaching the actual plants; and finally, how we add the many small details which brings the image to its realistic conclusion.

Photo: A. Reed

Photo: A. Reed

Then the students moved on to the second stage of the project. Having left areas of their paper blank, these young artists then had to tap into their imagination — considering the plant drawing they’d just finished in color — and continue the drawing by depicting some imaginary, fantastical imagery. We discussed how artists do this: sometimes by thinking of their own interests and drawing those (animals, movie characters, patterns, particular colors); sometimes by closing their eyes and letting their minds wander; sometimes by looking around and noticing pictures or words in their immediate environment, one of which might spur a memory or thought or other image. We made available an “imagination box” just in case — a small box with printed words inside of it (“space”, “machine”, “food”, “cartoon”) that might help students tap into their own imaginations.

Photo: A. Reed

Photo: A. Reed

In the end, the Grade 4 artists had the opportunity to practice different approaches to drawing — via observation and imagination — in the creation of original artworks begun in the natural world and ended in the world of their own imaginations.

Students begin their first art units of 2014-15

The elementary students are a few weeks into their art classes now and beginning their first unit projects. Students are learning — little by little — about themselves as creators, about how to communicate and take risks and reflect on their work, and about how to be independent, responsible art students.

Kindergarten  –  We’ve started by looking at how personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities. These young artists have observed and discussed a variety of other artists’ self-portraits, then drawn their own self-portraits from observation (black ink on paper) and also experimented with watercolor paints as they developed their faces in whichever manner they chose. At the same time, the students are becoming familiar with the elementary school art studio, learning what and where our materials and tools are and practicing being responsible, cooperative classmates in storing their artwork properly and cleaning up their workspaces.

Grade 1  –  Living creatures (animals, fish, birds, insects, and the like) are our focus at the moment. The young students are practicing how to draw living things realistically, both by observation — using photographs of the creatures — and with a step-by-step drawing process — from simple shapes and lines to more complex details. We will soon be discussing how people have an impact on the environment and will look at how the places where living things exist can be affected by the actions of humans. Later, the young artists will create large sculptures of their chosen creatures as a way to communicate their feelings about these issues.

Grade 2 – These young artists are focusing on how people can be enriched by their own cultures and the cultures they connect with throughout their lives. In art class, they have been practicing various modeling techniques with play dough in creating realistic human heads — using their hands and a variety of tools. Soon, the students will focus on a particular person in each of their lives, someone with whom each student celebrates a certain, significant cultural event. And the students will later create original sculptures of these people using clay and colored glazes.

Grade 3 – Three-dimensional sculpture is the current focus for these students, along with the overarching notion that exploring different learning styles helps individuals understand each other better. Thus far the young artists have made 7 practice sculptures, experimenting with different methods of manipulating paper. Soon they will be working collaboratively in small groups to create large sculptures, in a variety of media, which reveal something about themselves and their interests, individual strengths, and desires.

Grade 4 – Currently focused on the idea that organisms rely on one another, these students are also beginning to realize how the natural world is a rich source for imaginative artistic creation. We have looked at many artists and their artworks who use nature as inspiration for imagery. These young artists are now practicing drawing nature from observation and are also attempting to transform these realistic sketches into very imaginative pictures of whatever fantasies their minds create. Soon the students will create a final version of these nature-inspired drawings of fantasy.

Grade 5 – In their homeroom classes, the students have been focusing on the idea of conflict and how conflict affects lives. In art class at the moment, we have been looking at, discussing, and practicing how to create self-portraits. The students are also learning that portraits can be either realistic or abstract, that faces need not look “perfect” to represent someone or their feelings or personality. Soon the students will reflect on a situation of conflict in their own lives and attempt to communicate it through a self-portrait, and they will have elements in their portraits which are both realistic and abstract.

Welcome to art class 2014-15 !

AReed profile pic

Hello students and parents,

It’s Mr. Reed here, getting ready to begin learning and working and playing with the K-5 students in Art Class!

I wish you a warm welcome back to school for those of you who are returning, and for those of you new to Y.I.S. and/or to Japan, I hope you are finding your way around well (please don’t hesitate to ask questions).

We’re soon to begin our ES art classes, to reacquaint ourselves with one another, to welcome our new classmates, and to dive right into our first art projects. As you know, the ES art classes follow the Primary Years Program (PYP) and are well integrated into the work the children are doing across their various classes and subjects. It’s an exciting place to learn and grow and push new boundaries.

I look forward to meeting you at the upcoming Back To School Night on Wednesday, September 10. Please do feel free to drop into my classroom — room E-203, upper floor, K-1 building — at anytime to ask questions or simply to say ‘hello’.

Best to you all in 2014-15,

Aaron Reed

Grade 4 graphic designers complete their campaign posters

The 4th graders have completed their campaign posters, from a collaborative unit which focused on the central idea that the media can influence thinking and behavior. The students worked in small groups to develop their own media campaign on a subject of their choosing. In art class, the students learned about Contrast, Unity, and Balance as principles of design, and they used these guidelines to help them create a visual display (e.g. a campaign poster) to communicate their goal for their campaign.

The students made much progress in learning how to communicate visually using Contrast, Unity, and Balance to create a simple, clear message with text and images. Here are the results, the campaign posters created by these young graphic designers as well as photos of the students at work:

Students had the choice to create their posters either digitally on their laptops or “traditionally” by hand (pencils, rulers, paper, colored pencils, and/or markers). Students who completed their posters with time to spare also had the opportunity to create a toy or token as another aspect to their campaigns. These objects were designed digitally with an online software program called TinkerCad and then printed on the school’s 3D printer.

Ultimately, the goals for the Grade 4 art students were for them to provide constructive criticism when responding to an artwork, to recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artwork, and to show an awareness of the affective power of the visual arts. More details about the project can be found here.

The 2014 YAMATE ART EXHIBITION

The annual Yamate Art Exhibition has begun!

The exhibition runs from Friday February 14 to Monday February 24 at Bluff No. 115-3, The British House — link here — across the street from Y.I.S. (横浜市中区山手町115-3) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 24.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, each exhibited at a different residence on The Bluff.

There are 86 elementary school artists in this year’s show, so do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 students!

Yamate Art Exhibition – ES Artists on display

A number of our elementary school art students will have their artwork exhibited in the annual Yamate Art Show: February 14 – 24 at Bluff No. 115-3, The British House — link here — across the street from Y.I.S. (横浜市中区山手町115-3) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 24.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, each exhibited at a different residence on The Bluff.

Do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery at Bluff No. 115-3 and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 artists!

4th Graders complete & present their Ainu creations

After much preparation, planning, and hard work — in all their classes — the fourth graders finally completed their study of the Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan. In art class, the culmination of their efforts was the completion of their Ainu-inspired garments: large fabrics displaying abstract, symmetrical designs and patterns, using motifs based on some of those used by the Ainu in their traditional clothing and others created individually by the students themselves. Though some of the designs resemble thorns and swirls (“ayus” and “morew” in Ainu) like in a plant or vine, the students learned that the images are not representational and do not symbolize anything or have a particular message. Rather, they were interested to learn that the placement of the patterns they created (near the openings of their clothes) is intended to keep evil gods or spirits from gaining access to the Ainu’s bodies.

The students worked hard in practicing, planning, and developing their projects, beginning with sketching and drawing in their sketchbooks. Some patterns were created from colored cloth (which they traced, cut, and glued); others were drawn and colored with pastels and/or fabric paint. Some students used rulers in order to achieve perfect symmetry. Once completed, the students displayed their garments to their parents and classmates during their performance and sharing in the auditorium.

A short video clip of one of the Ainu dances, in which their garments were worn: