Grade 2 artists create culturally-specific clay sculptures

The Grade 2 students have been focused on the central idea that people can be enriched by their own cultures and the cultures they connect with throughout their lives. In art class we are focused on the personal connections the children make through their cultural celebrations.

The Grade 2 art students are creating clay sculptures: original artifacts of each student’s experience in reflecting on a cultural celebration that he/she experiences with family (and/or friends).  Having chosen a particular person whom the student associates with this cultural celebration, the children are beginning to move from the practice (play dough) stage to the final (clay) stage of their sculptures.

The students have used these two videos to assist them in their work and to allow them to work at their own pace, accessing the desired instruction as needed. The first video focuses on the basic head, eyes, nose, and mouth forms:

The second video addresses additional details such as the teeth, lips, eyelids/eyelashes/eyebrows:

And — as the human nose seemed to be the most challenging facial feature to model — a third video was created later, as it became apparent that some students needed alternative approaches to sculpting a nose:

Once having modeled and carved a head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair, and the related details in clay, the students’ sculptural heads will each be attached to a clay base, engraved with a name, bisque-fired, glazed in color, and finally glaze-fired.  The artworks will unfortunately not be completed in time for display at the Cross Cultural Lunch on Friday October 4; however, photographs of their works-in-progress will be showcased there.

Here are some images of the students at work in art class:
(unfortunately, FLICKR slideshows are not compatible with phone/tablet displays)

The children are looking forward to sharing their artwork with their parents at the Cross Cultural Lunch!

Typhoon 18 & Art

Hi boys & girls,

Because of the typhoon, some of you (1S, KB, 3L, 5B, 4N, plus the Young Artists Group ESA students) will be missing your art class today. I’m certainly sorry about that!

If you’re interested in doing some art today, check the Online Art Resources up at the top of this page — let me know which ones you like or don’t like.

Stay inside and safe today, but don’t forget to look out the window too and see how the environment around you — the sky, trees, land, plants — looks different during a big storm such as this. And listen to the sounds! Did you ever try to draw a sound? An artist named Arthur Dove tried to paint sounds! Look at his painting below and try to guess what sound this is (you can write a comment below if you have an answer):

This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

See you soon,

Mr. Reed

First week of Art Class in 2013-14

The beginning week of school is behind us, and most of the ES students have come to the art studio for the first time. Kindergarten and Grade 1 will have their first class starting in Week 2, although some of the kindergarten students were kind enough to come upstairs to meet Mr. Reed and to see their new art studio.

Grades 2 – 5 enjoyed the incredible picture book ‘Chalk’ (see it in the YIS Library!) and then each had a warm-up art activity to get their brains and eyes and hands ready for the upcoming Unit 1 projects. Grade 2 worked with plasticine (playdough) in anticipation of their ‘Where We Are In Place And Time’ clay portrait project. Grade 3 were challenged to create paper sculptures as they prepare for their ‘Who We Are’ 3-D sculptural project. Grade 4 played with abstract designs in creating patterns as they look forward to their ‘Where We Are In Place And Time’ wearable fabric project. And Grade 5 drew two self-portraits (one with a mirror and one without) in preparation for their ‘Sharing The Planet’ project on conflict resolution.

You can see some of the children at work here over the past several days:

Drawing during vacation?!?!

I know that some students love drawing. Some of you love drawing after school, over the weekends, and on vacations. If you plan to do some drawing during the summer and want to practice your observational drawing (meaning that you want to learn to draw real things more realistically), then watch the following two videos.

This short instructional video reviews the basic steps to drawing realistically from observation (this mean: by looking closely at the thing you’re trying to draw):
1. FIRST, DRAW THE SIMPLE SHAPES AND LINES
2. THEN, REFINE YOUR SHAPES AND LINES
3. FINALLY, ADD DETAILS LAST
*And always draw very LIGHTLY at first, so you can erase those lines easily later on.

The second video is a bit longer, reviews the same ideas, but goes into a bit more depth:

The key thing is to look closely at the different types of lines and shapes you see on the thing you’re drawing.
Remember: lines can be STRAIGHT, CURVED, BENT, ZIG-ZAG, CURLY, WAVY, THIN, THICK, SHORT, LONG, DOTTED, DASHED, and more.
Remember: shapes can be CIRCLES, OVALS, SQUARES, RECTANGLES, TRIANGLES, OBLONG, THIN, WIDE, ORGANIC, GEOMETRIC, DIAMONDS, PENTAGONS, HEXAGONS, OCTAGONS, STARS, and more.

Don’t forget to have your eraser by your side. Erasing is important! It means that you’ve noticed something about your drawing that you can do better! So just erase your first effort and try again.

“If you are not making mistakes, you’re not taking enough risks.” – Debbie Millman, artist & designer

 

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2nd Graders complete (and launch) their storybooks

A final post for the 2nd graders here — to announce that after long, arduous, and impressive work, the young authors & illustrators have completed their storybooks and held their book launch for parents.

See the images of the children at work illustrating and binding (as well as some of their favorite pages) below — and previous posts here and here — to get an idea of what went into this massive project. And if you haven’t read any of their stories, find a second grader today and ask!

2nd Graders near completion of their illustrated storybooks

After many weeks of work writing and editing their stories in their homeroom classes and illustrating in art class, the Second Graders near completion of their personal storybooks — written, illustrated, and published by each student individually — based on the central idea that stories can be constructed, retold, and interpreted in different ways.

In art class, the students have been focusing on how to communicate their stories visually through the illustrations which accompany the text on each page. By examining and reading a number of different storybooks, the students observe and discuss that there is a relationship between the pictures and words on a single page. They also observe and come to understand that the illustrations can be greatly varied yet need enough detail to show the action, the important events of the story. Many students are now binding their books: some with staples, some with glue, others with needle and thread.

Here are some images of these young author-illustrators at work:

2nd Graders illustrate their original stories

The Second Graders have been working in their homeroom classes on creating storybooks — written, illustrated, and published by each student individually — based on the central idea that stories can be constructed, retold, and interpreted in different ways.

In art class, the students have been focusing on how to communicate their stories visually through the illustrations which accompany the text on each page. By examining and reading a number of different storybooks, the students observe and discuss that there is a relationship between the pictures and words on a single page.  They also observe and come to understand that the illustrations can be greatly varied yet need enough detail to show the action, the important events of the story.

The Second Graders begun the visual aspect of their books by planning: creating storyboards with thumbnail sketches to show the basic progression of images. They are also making choices about how they publish their storybooks: the size, the manner of printing and displaying the text with the images, the binding, and various details concerning the front and back covers. Here are some images of these young author-illustrators at work:

Yamate Art Exhibition 2012-13: E.S. art students on display!

The Yamate Art Exhibition is on!

A number of our elementary school art students have their artwork exhibited now in the annual Yamate Art Show: February 15 – 26 at Bluff No. 111 (Yamanote Ichibankan 111, tel. 045-623-2957) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 26.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, on view in other galleries located at: Bluff No. 234, Berrick Hall (St. Maur), Bluff No. 18, Diplomat’s House, and Osaragi Jiro Memorial Museum.

Do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery at Bluff No. 111 and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 artists! If you can’t, see the images below for a sampling of what you’re missing!

2nd Grade completes their “Passion” books

After several weeks of focusing on the visual depiction of their favorite things, the second graders have finished the construction of their books as of this week. The objective of this drawing and bookmaking project was to understand that people can communicate visually: the students sought to express a personal passion and to communicate this passion in a book without words, only images.

The students began by sketching as a method of making notes of their thoughts about the things they like and like to do. Through discussion and describing these images, the students determined what pictures best convey what they are passionate about. Having chosen their images, the children drew them realistically (either from memory or via downloaded images from the laptops); then added critical details to their drawings; inked the pictures; cut & glued them into their folded pages; and finally, constructed the front and back covers by carefully wrapping the hardcover boards with a selection of printed Japanese paper.

See our young, passionate bookmakers in progress below…

Here is the video the students watched to learn how to wrap their two covers with the Japanese paper:

2nd Grade creates books: communicating one’s passion visually — without words

Having completed their three-dimensional clay sculptural portraits, the 2nd graders have moved on to a different type of construction: the creation of small books. The objective of this project is two-fold: to express a personal passion and to communicate this passion in a book with no words, only images.

The students have used sketching as a method of making notes of their thoughts. Through discussion and describing their images, the students begin to hone their choices as to what pictures best convey what they are passionate about. Once they’ve chosed their images, the children are challenged to draw them so that they are recognizable; in some cases they must add critical details to their drawings in order to make the audience aware of their imagery. Students collaborate and give one another feedback so as to reach a visual clarity in their artwork.

Once the images are drawn in pencil and then traced in black ink, the assembly of the book and covers will begin.

Here’s the video the students watched to help them begin to construct their books: