Grade 1 creates life cycle dioramas

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

In their homeroom classes, the Grade 1 students examined how all living things go through a process of change. With Ms. Zoe and Ms. Saito the students looked at the cycles of life, how the creatures in our world change over their lifetime. And so in art class we have focused on the key concept of Change, as the children created artwork in response to a variety of stimuli. In so doing, they were challenged to identify a chosen living creature, to plan a way to visually display its particular life cycle, and then to make specific choices of materials, tools, and processes.

The students came to art class with much knowledge and many ideas from their homeroom inquiry. And after several weeks of work, they recently completed their life cycle dioramas — having utilized colored paper, pencils, colored pencils, oil pastels, scissors, staplers, soil, sticks, leaves, playdough, toothpicks, popsicle sticks, paint & paintbrushes, beads, rocks & pebbles, paste, wire, hot glue guns, and other media. Ultimately, these art students have attempted to transform ideas and materials into three-dimensional dioramas designed to educate their audience (parents and other students) about the various life cycles of living creatures.

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

The parent-sharing day is coming soon. All their dioramas are currently on display in the Grade 1 classrooms. Come have a look!

Kindergarten explore their growth through reflection, materials, and imagination

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

The kindergarten students have been very busy creating a class picture book, individual personal storybooks, and individual sculptures. Our initial central idea in kindergarten this year is that “personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities.” And a recent central idea that we have been addressing is that “materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose”.

photo © by A.Reed

In art class over the past two months, the students have been addressing both of these notions as they express their learning and their desires visually in both two and three dimensions. A big event in the kindergarten class was their trip to a sweet potato farm. And so in art class we created an original book, The Sweet Potato Farm, with color illustrations and narrative words documenting the students’ learning and growth before, during, and after their trip.

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Later, these young artists progressed in a different direction with their work by exploring, manipulating, and transforming a variety of materials for stated reasons into personally imagined pieces of art. Having visited the Grade 12’s DP Art Exhibition recently, the students became aware of the “artist’s statement” and how artists explain the meaning or purpose or their work and their process. So in the library exhibition of the Kindergarten students’ sculptures, visitors can read each young artist’s statement about their own work.

photos © by M.Swatphakdi

photos © by M.Swatphakdi

We took the time to:

1. to look at, question, enjoy experiencing, discuss the various types of two- and three-dimensional works made by other artists (looking at pictures, watching videos, and examining others’ artworks);

2. to identify the materials and processes other artists use in the creation of their artworks, as well as to look at where these materials come from and how they are manufactured;

3. to realize that our artwork has meaning;

4. to experiment with some different materials that can be used to create 2-D and 3-D artwork, such as those that come from wood, metal, plastic, plants: we’ve explored and used paper, felt, aluminum foil, toothpicks, popsicle sticks, burlap, paper & plastic straws, ribbon, wire, pipe cleaners, foam, spools, cotton, string, uncooked pasta, scissors, glue, tape, staplers, hole punches, colored pencils, paints, markers, and pastels);

5. to explore the various processes that artists can employ with these materials and tools to create what they envision and to discover new ideas.

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Through this exploration and by making decisions for themselves, the young students have created original storybooks and 3-D artworks. The next time you see a kindergarten student at recess, ask him or her to explain the sculpture that he/she has created in art class. Or ask to to read and see their class pictures book: The Sweet Potato Farm. And don’t forget to visit their library sculpture exhibition!

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Kindergarten explores materials and imagination

Our initial central idea in kindergarten this year is that “personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities.” Another of our central ideas is that “materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose”. In art class over the past several weeks, we have been addressing both of these notions as the children have expressed their desires in how to progress with their work.

SLIDESHOW:

So, in art class, we’re exploring a variety of materials and ideas across a few different projects: paintings, cardboard and playdough and clay sculptures, and multi-media sculptures.

We’re taking the time to:

1. to look at, question, enjoy experiencing, discuss the various types of three-dimensional works made by other artists (looking at pictures, watching videos, and examining others’ artworks);

2. to identify the materials and processes other artists use in the creation of their artworks;

3. to realize that our artwork has meaning;

4. to experiment with some different materials that can be used to create artwork (recently, we looked at, touched with our hands, and then used: paper, felt, burlap, paper straws, ribbon, wire, pipe cleaners, foam, string, uncooked pasta, scissors, glue, tape, staplers, hole punches, colored pencils, watercolor paints, markers, and pastels);

5. to explore the various processes that artists can employ with these materials and tools to create what they envision and to discover new ideas.

Through this exploration and by making decisions for themselves, the young students are creating original 3-D artworks, as seen in the slideshow of images above. Ask the students to explain their art as you look at the photos of them at work.

The 2015 YAMATE ART EXHIBITION

The annual Yamate Art Exhibition has begun!

The exhibition runs from Saturday February 14 to Monday February 23 at Bluff No. 115-3, The British House — link here — across the street from Y.I.S. (横浜市中区山手町115-3) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 23.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, each exhibited at a different residence on The Bluff.

There are 114 elementary school artists in this year’s show, so do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 students!

 

Grade 1 explores Life Cycles in three dimensions

In their homeroom classes the Grade 1 students focused on the central idea that all living things go through a process of change. The students studied a variety of living things, and then each child chose a particular one to focus on for his or her art project. After some discussion and review of a ‘life cycle’ in art class and then practicing drawing the chosen creature (either butterfly, turtle, or bird), the students began to think about how they could communicate the concept of a life cycle — not only visually but also in three dimensions.

In this unit the students created artwork in response to a variety of stimuli, and they identified, planned, and made specific choices of materials, tools, and processes. Below, see the students at work on their sculptures and dioramas and see some of their finished projects.

The children worked diligently to create multiple sculptures from plasticine so as to represent the beginning, middle, and end of their creatures’ life cycles. Once their sculptures were completed — after being pushed to develop further their modeling and painting skills — the students then constructed three-dimensional dioramas from paper, pencil, pastels, markers (and words/labels), creating environments for their artwork in which to present their new knowledge and skills. With the sculptures installed in the dioramas, the students were ready to present their projects to the other students, to teachers, and to parents at their Friday assembly performance.

Kindergarten artists explore materials, processes, and passions

Our initial central idea in kindergarten this year is that “personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities.” Another of our central ideas is that “materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose”. In art class over the past few weeks, we have been addressing both of these notions as the children have expressed their desires in how to progress with their work.

So, in art class, we’re addressing both ideas across a few different projects: paper crowns, plasticine sculptures, and masks.

We’re taking the time to:

1. to look at, question, enjoy experiencing, discuss the various types of three-dimensional works made by other artists (looking at pictures, watching videos, and examining others’ artworks);

2. to identify the materials and processes other artists use in the creation of their artworks;

3. to realize that our artwork has meaning;

4. to experiment with some different materials that can be used to create artwork (recently, we looked at, touched with our hands, and then used: paper, felt, burlap, paper straws, ribbon, wire, pipe cleaners, foam, string, uncooked pasta, scissors, glue, tape, staplers, hole punches, colored pencils, watercolor paints, markers, and pastels.

5. to explore the various processes that artists can employ with these materials and tools to create what they envision and to discover new ideas.

Through this exploration and by making decisions for themselves, the young students are creating original 3-D artworks — crowns of widely different designs, sculptures of people, animals, fictional characters, and various objects of interest to the children, and masks (an idea thought up by Ms. Zoe’s class with a very specific purpose, but don’t tell Ms. Zoe because it’s a surprise).

First Graders explore Life Cycles in three dimensions

In their homeroom classes the 1st graders focused on the central idea that all living things go through a process of change. The students studied a variety of living things, and then each child chose a particular one to focus on for his or her art project. After some discussion and review of a ‘life cycle’ in art class and then practicing drawing the chosen mammal (or insect or plant, etc), the students began to think about how they could communicate the concept of a life cycle — not only visually but also in three dimensions.

The children worked diligently to create multiple sculptures from plasticine so as to represent the beginning, middle, and end of their tiger’s or tree’s or penguin’s life cycles. Once their sculptures were completed — after being pushed to develop further their modeling and painting skills — the students then constructed three-dimensional dioramas from paper, pencil, pastels, markers (and words), creating environments for their artwork in which to present their new knowledge and skills. With the sculptures installed in the dioramas, the students were ready to present their projects to the other students, to teachers, and to parents at their Friday assembly performance.

Below, see the students at work on their sculptures and dioramas, see some of their finished projects, and see the display of their work at the Friday assembly.

Kindergarten artists explore materials and stretch their imaginations

Look here to see the young sculptors in action:

The kindergarteners have again been exploring the central idea that materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose. In art class, we have again taken the time to consider the various types of materials that can be used to create artwork — and talked more about how we can use our imagination to create things about which we are passionate and interested.

The children spent one class period playing — individually and with partners — with over 100 almost-discarded cardboard packing ‘elbows’, creating buildings and castles and vehicles and other sculptures. We were thankful that the IT Dept donated these elbows to our ES Art class.

The children then thought about and discussed what a single one of these packing elbows could become. Each student was given one, plus the choice of a variety of materials to attach to his/her piece — paper (straws, sheets), plastic (cord), and wood (beads, sticks) — using either glue guns or their hands (twisting, knotting). The children have been maturing in their ability to take responsibility for the care of tools and materials and for their own and others’ safety in the art studio environment.

Later, the students had the option to color their creations with paint. As they developed their sculptures, they were asked to identify: what they were making; why they chose to make that particular thing; the materials and processes used in their creation. Upon completion, each student briefly described his or her imaginary creation to the class.

As their kindergarten year ends, the students are continuing their hands-on, creative journey in enjoying their experiences creating and responding to artworks and in showing curiosity and asking questions about their own and others’ projects.

Kindergarten continues exploring new ways to make & color pictures

The students have continued to pursue a central idea in Kindergarten which is that materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose. In art class we have been taking the time to consider the various types of materials that can be used to create artwork — or anything that the children’s minds think up.

Having painted with white paint on black paper, then colored with a variety of dry media (oil pastels, chalk pastels, colored pencils, markers), the students then were offered numerous other materials to add to their pictures. Having already explored materials such as wood, paper, metal, plastic, and cloth & string — and where these things come from — the students used these items as they saw fit to develop an artwork. The main focus was two-fold: one, to develop an awareness of the source of the materials that people use to make art and, two, to explore and understand various methods of combining and attaching different materials together to achieve a personal objective.

Here are the students in action along with their completed artwork:

Kindergarten explores different ways to make and color pictures

A central idea in Kindergarten is that materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose. So, in art class, we take the time to consider the various types of materials that can be used to create artwork — or anything that the children’s minds think up.

As we seem to spend a lot of our drawing and painting time working on white paper, we decided to make pictures with white lines and shapes on black paper instead. After looking at different white-on-black images made by other artists, the students had their choice of what to depict.  Once their pictures were dry, we looked at the primary types of dry coloring materials that we use in art class: oil pastels, chalk pastels, colored pencils, and markers. Each student spend some time testing these colors on black paper, and then we discussed together their observations. Students then made choices about the type of coloring materials they used to color their white-on-black pictures.

Here’s the exploration in process: