Grade 4 graphic designers create campaign posters

The Grade 4 students have completed their campaign posters, from a collaborative unit which focused on the central idea that the media can influence thinking and behavior. The students worked in small groups to develop their own media campaign on a subject of their choosing. In art class, the students learned about Contrast, Unity, and Balance as principles of design, and they used these guidelines to help them create a visual display (e.g. a campaign poster) to communicate their goal for their campaign. The students made much progress in learning how to communicate visually using Contrast, Unity, and Balance to create a simple, clear message with text and images.

Have a look at the students at work:

This year our Grade 4 graphic designers relied on both traditional tools (pencil & paper) and contemporary tools (laptops & digital apps) to help them to create their posters. Student had the choice of using their own drawings, photos they took themselves, and/or photos found with Creative Commons or other appropriate search tools. Creating and combining text & imagery with Google Drawing, the students were able to work collaboratively to achieve varied levels of successful visual communication through good contrast, unity, balance, and interesting imagery.

Both the students’ rough draft designs and their final version were shared with their peers globally on the website Creatubbles, where students both at YIS and in other schools worldwide could view and comments on their graphic design work. Our Grade 4 students used some of the constructive feedback to help them improve their visual communication. See the students’ work in these two galleries (you’ll need to join Creatubbles first, but it’s easy and free to do so): Gr.4 Rough Draft Posters and Gr.4 Final Posters.

The students’ final posters have been printed in color and being exhibited in the stairwell display area in the K-1 building. Ultimately, the goals for the Grade 4 art students were for them to provide constructive criticism when responding to an artwork, to recognize that different audiences respond in different ways to artwork, and to show an awareness of the affective power of the visual arts.

Kindergarten artists explore materials and stretch their imaginations

Look here to see the young sculptors in action:

The kindergarteners have again been exploring the central idea that materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose. In art class, we have again taken the time to consider the various types of materials that can be used to create artwork — and talked more about how we can use our imagination to create things about which we are passionate and interested.

The children spent one class period playing — individually and with partners — with over 100 almost-discarded cardboard packing ‘elbows’, creating buildings and castles and vehicles and other sculptures. We were thankful that the IT Dept donated these elbows to our ES Art class.

The children then thought about and discussed what a single one of these packing elbows could become. Each student was given one, plus the choice of a variety of materials to attach to his/her piece — paper (straws, sheets), plastic (cord), and wood (beads, sticks) — using either glue guns or their hands (twisting, knotting). The children have been maturing in their ability to take responsibility for the care of tools and materials and for their own and others’ safety in the art studio environment.

Later, the students had the option to color their creations with paint. As they developed their sculptures, they were asked to identify: what they were making; why they chose to make that particular thing; the materials and processes used in their creation. Upon completion, each student briefly described his or her imaginary creation to the class.

As their kindergarten year ends, the students are continuing their hands-on, creative journey in enjoying their experiences creating and responding to artworks and in showing curiosity and asking questions about their own and others’ projects.

4th Graders complete their fictional campaign posters

The 4th graders have completed their fictional campaign posters — using assumed identities of a favorite character or animal or creature — focused on the centail idea that “the media can influence thinking and behavior.”

Focusing on a favorite movie, book, or comic character or on a real person or a pet, each student assumed a new identity and determined: What would I campaign for at this school — what would I want to change — to make my experience better at Y.I.S.? Having created sketches and plans for campaign posters (using images and text) to communicate their ideas to others and following a basic approach to design known as C.U.B. (Contrast, Unity, Balance), the students developed their projects. The visual arts aim is to have the students understand and know how to employ these three design principles so as to help to make for the effective visual presentation of their ideas.

Here are the results, the campaign posters created by these young graphic designers:

4th Graders progress with their fictional campaign posters

The 4th graders continue to create fictional campaign posters — using assumed identities of a favorite character or animal or creature — focused on the centail idea that “the media can influence thinking and behavior.”

Each student is assuming their new identity (who is also a student at Y.I.S.) and determining: What would I campaign for at this school — what would I want to change — to make my experience better at Y.I.S.? Having created sketches and plans for campaign posters (using images and text) to communicate their ideas to others and following a basic approach to design known as C.U.B. (Contrast, Unity, Balance), the students are now well into the creation of their final projects.  The visual arts aim is to have the students understand and know how to employ these three design principles so as to help to make for the effective visual presentation of their ideas.

Here are the young graphic designers at work, including samples of some of their concepts:

4th Graders begin a fictional campaign poster

The 4th graders created campaigns in their homeroom classes. The central idea was: “The media can influence thinking and behavior.” Now, in art class, each student is assuming a fictional identity (someone other than their actual selves; could be a real person, a book or movie character, a cartoon character, or a creature or animal) as the starting point of their new project.

Then each student attempts to see what it would be like to be a student at Y.I.S. as this fictional character and to determine: What would I campaign for at this school — what would I want to change — to make my experience better at Y.I.S.? Next, the students are challenged to create campaign posters to communicate their ideas to others, via images and text (pictures and words). The example presented by Mr. Reed is Bugs Bunny: if Bugs Bunny were a student at YIS, Mr. Reed thought, he would certainly want there to be more carrots in the cafeteria. And so Mr. Reed’s development of his campaign poster follows suit.

Students are being guided through a basic approach to design known as C.U.B. (Contrast, Unity, Balance) — focused on three design principles which help to make for the effective visual presentation of an idea.

See the students at work on the current stage of their projects here: