Kindergarten’s artistic journey has begun

photo: A. Reed

In our first unit of inquiry, the Kindergarten students have been looking at the concept of Change and how personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities. We are looking at how our artwork changes and grows over time, from ELC last year, to Kindergarten this year, and on to Grade 1 next year.

In the artistic journey that these young artists have begun, they have

  • drawn & painted their own self-portraits from observation
  • observed and discussed different artists’ self-portraits
  • experimented with a variety of lines, shapes, colors, tools, materials, and processes in creating personal 3-D crowns
  • begun making choices about artworks based on personal preferences and interests.

We aim to enjoy experiencing artworks, to show curiosity and ask questions about them, and to realize that our artwork has meaning.

At the same time, the students are becoming familiar with the elementary school art studio, learning what and where our materials and tools are, and practicing being responsible, cooperative classmates in storing artwork properly and cleaning up our workspaces.

Kindergarten explore their growth through reflection, materials, and imagination

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

The kindergarten students have been very busy creating a class picture book, individual personal storybooks, and individual sculptures. Our initial central idea in kindergarten this year is that “personal journeys show the way that people change and can lead to new opportunities.” And a recent central idea that we have been addressing is that “materials can be manipulated to suit a purpose”.

photo © by A.Reed

In art class over the past two months, the students have been addressing both of these notions as they express their learning and their desires visually in both two and three dimensions. A big event in the kindergarten class was their trip to a sweet potato farm. And so in art class we created an original book, The Sweet Potato Farm, with color illustrations and narrative words documenting the students’ learning and growth before, during, and after their trip.

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Later, these young artists progressed in a different direction with their work by exploring, manipulating, and transforming a variety of materials for stated reasons into personally imagined pieces of art. Having visited the Grade 12’s DP Art Exhibition recently, the students became aware of the “artist’s statement” and how artists explain the meaning or purpose or their work and their process. So in the library exhibition of the Kindergarten students’ sculptures, visitors can read each young artist’s statement about their own work.

photos © by M.Swatphakdi

photos © by M.Swatphakdi

We took the time to:

1. to look at, question, enjoy experiencing, discuss the various types of two- and three-dimensional works made by other artists (looking at pictures, watching videos, and examining others’ artworks);

2. to identify the materials and processes other artists use in the creation of their artworks, as well as to look at where these materials come from and how they are manufactured;

3. to realize that our artwork has meaning;

4. to experiment with some different materials that can be used to create 2-D and 3-D artwork, such as those that come from wood, metal, plastic, plants: we’ve explored and used paper, felt, aluminum foil, toothpicks, popsicle sticks, burlap, paper & plastic straws, ribbon, wire, pipe cleaners, foam, spools, cotton, string, uncooked pasta, scissors, glue, tape, staplers, hole punches, colored pencils, paints, markers, and pastels);

5. to explore the various processes that artists can employ with these materials and tools to create what they envision and to discover new ideas.

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Through this exploration and by making decisions for themselves, the young students have created original storybooks and 3-D artworks. The next time you see a kindergarten student at recess, ask him or her to explain the sculpture that he/she has created in art class. Or ask to to read and see their class pictures book: The Sweet Potato Farm. And don’t forget to visit their library sculpture exhibition!

photo © by A.Reed

photo © by A.Reed

Grade 2 artists create clay sculptures based on cultural celebrations

Earlier this year, the Grade 2 students focused on the central idea that people can be enriched by their own cultures and the cultures they connect with throughout their lives. In art class we focused on the personal connections the children make through their cultural celebrations.

The Grade 2 art students created clay sculptures: original artifacts of each student’s experience in reflecting on a cultural celebration that he/she experiences with family (and/or friends).  Having chosen a particular person whom the student associates with this cultural celebration, the children moved from the practice (play dough) stage to the final (clay) stage of their sculptures. The students have used these two videos to assist them in their work and to allow them to work at their own pace, accessing the desired instruction as needed. The first video focuses on the basic head, eyes, nose, and mouth forms:

The second video addresses additional details such as the teeth, lips, eyelids/eyelashes/eyebrows:

And — as the human nose seemed to be the most challenging facial feature to model — a third video was created later, as it became apparent that some students needed alternative approaches to sculpting a nose:

Having modeled and carved a head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair, and the related details in clay, the students attached the heads to a clay base and engraved the subject’s name. Once bisque-fired, the sculptures were glazed in color and finally glaze-fired.  The artworks were unfortunately not completed in time for display at the Cross Cultural Lunch in October; however, they are now complete and ready to share at the Student-Led Conferences this month.

Here are some images of the students at work in art class:

Grade 1 Reflects on Personal Histories in Family Portraits

In their homeroom classes the Grade 1 students studied how one’s family history provides insight into one’s own personal identity, and in art class the students drew and then painted their self-/family-portraits. For this “Where We Are In Place And Time” unit focused on the concept of REFLECTION, each student developed the background of his/her picture by adding imagery from the memory of family events or from knowledge of his/her family’s history. In the foreground of each student’s picture is their own self-portrait, drawn from observation with mirrors.

See the students at work, below, reflecting on their own family histories and attempting to depict them through various processes: drawing from observation, drawing realistically, practicing mixing new colors, and depicting details so that the audience can understand the stories and events.

Created in response to a range of stimuli (photos, storybooks, conversations, sharing of personal experiences), students made personal connections to their artworks as they developed. The task proved challenging as the students had reflect — on their inquiries in the homeroom class and at home with parents — to determine how to represent, visually, what they envision in their minds and what they can discuss verbally.

See the students’ completed artwork below. Each student used his/her portrait as a talking point during the recent Parent-Sharing to discuss his/her personal family history.

Grade 1 Reflects on Personal Histories in Family Portraits

In their homeroom classes the 1st graders studied how one’s family history provides insight into one’s own personal identity, and in art class the students drew and then painted their self-/family-portraits. For this “Where We Are In Place And Time” unit, each student developed the background of his/her picture by adding imagery from the memory of family events or from knowledge of his/her family’s history. In the foreground of each student’s picture is their own self-portrait, drawn from observation.

See the students at work, below, shortly before the completion of these family portraits. Moms and dads even came one day (during Action Portfolio Week) to observe and help out!

Created in response to a range of stimuli (photos, storybooks, conversations, sharing of personal experiences), students made personal connections to their artworks as they developed. The task proved challenging as the students had to determine how to represent, visually, what they envision in their minds and what they can discuss verbally.

See the students’ completed artwork below. Each student used his/her portrait as a talking point during the recent Student-Led Conferences to discuss his/her personal family history.

Grade 5 presents transformed landscapes

In the Kirin Building (2nd floor) there is a display of the 5th graders creations from their second art unit:  an original landscape drawing, in pencil, combining the observational drawing of an existing landscape (from a photograph) and their own imaginative/fantasy/invented scene. The overarching central idea for this unit was “Changes in the world affect how artists create art.”

Image licensed under a CC Attr-NonComm-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License by Aaron Reed

Image licensed under a CC Attr-NonComm-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License by Aaron Reed

Focused on the key concept of ‘change’, the students first focused on a change in the world in the 19th century: the scientific and technology revolution which was the invention of the camera and how that affected the artists (the Impressionists) of the time and thereafter. One line of inquiry was “How discoveries have impacted society and the arts”; students had various opinions as to how photography might have affected artists both positively and negatively. Students also used this discussion of Impressionism as a jumping off point to learning to sketch a landscape and to experiment with colors, coloring mixing (painting), and related terminology.

Image licensed under a CC Attr-NonComm-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License by Aaron Reed

Image licensed under a CC Attr-NonComm-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License by Aaron Reed

Next, following the line of inquiry “The transformation of ideas into art, factors involved”, students used an actual landscape (a found photographic image found via the internet, i.e. new technology) to help create a drawn reproduction (pencil, eraser, paper, i.e. old/traditional technology) of the scene. Then, with the concept of ‘change’ in mind — and having seen some imaginative landscapes by working artists — students mined their own imaginations and interests to transform the existing, actual landscape into something fantastical, changing areas of the image to incorporate their imaginative visions.

The 2015 YAMATE ART EXHIBITION

The annual Yamate Art Exhibition has begun!

The exhibition runs from Saturday February 14 to Monday February 23 at Bluff No. 115-3, The British House — link here — across the street from Y.I.S. (横浜市中区山手町115-3) from 9:30-17:00 daily, 9:30-12:00 on Feb 23.

This art show is part of the Yokohama Yamate Art Festival and includes the artwork of students from several schools in the Yamate area, each exhibited at a different residence on The Bluff.

There are 114 elementary school artists in this year’s show, so do come visit the Y.I.S. student gallery and see the energy, efforts, and two- & three-dimensional creativity of our Kindergarten through Grade 5 students!

 

Grade 5 instructions for new project (Unit 2)

Hello Grade 5 students!

We discussed some of the changes that occurred in science & technology around the time of the Impressionists, specifically the advent of photography.

You had some interesting opinions about how the camera might have affected the artists of that time. Suffice to say there was a big CHANGE in the art world as the 19th century became the 20th century.

old camera

Today in art class you will begin creating your own landscape picture, one which will also focus on the concept of CHANGE. You will need to use your powers of observation!

Please follow these instructions for Part One of the project — read & observe the images you see here:

If you have finished drawing your landscape, check with Mr. Reed for the next step and instructions (your imagination will now come into play).

Have fun!

Grade 2 artists create culturally-specific clay sculptures

The Grade 2 students have been focused on the central idea that people can be enriched by their own cultures and the cultures they connect with throughout their lives. In art class we are focused on the personal connections the children make through their cultural celebrations.

Photo: A. Reed - CC BY-NC-ND

Photo: A. Reed – CC BY-NC-ND

The Grade 2 art students are creating clay sculptures: original artifacts of each student’s experience in reflecting on a cultural celebration that he/she experiences with family (and/or friends).  Having chosen a particular person whom the student associates with this cultural celebration, the children have moved from the practice (play dough) stage to the final (clay) stage of their sculptures: currently the sculptures are drying and will soon be put in the kiln for the first firing.

Photo: A.Reed - CC BY-NC-ND

Photo: A.Reed – CC BY-NC-ND

The students have used these two videos to assist them in their work and to allow them to work at their own pace, accessing the desired instruction as needed. The first video focuses on the basic head, eyes, nose, and mouth forms:

The second video addresses additional details such as the teeth, lips, eyelids/eyelashes/eyebrows:

And — as the human nose seemed to be the most challenging facial feature to model — a third video was created later, as it became apparent that some students needed alternative approaches to sculpting a nose:

Having modeled and carved a head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair, and the related details in clay, the students attached the heads to a clay base and engraved the subject’s name. Once bisque-fired, the sculptures will be glazed in color and finally glaze-fired.  The artworks were unfortunately not completed in time for display at the Cross Cultural Lunch on last Friday October 3; however, photographs of their works-in-progress were showcased there.

Here are some images of the students at work in art class:
(unfortunately, FLICKR slideshows are not compatible with phone/tablet displays)